Tag: treatment for insomnia

Tai chi may improve sleep for insomnia sufferers with other health problems

Tai Chi When Insomnia Isn’t the Only Problem

Insomnia combined with other health problems is bound to cause distress.

But help is at hand. New research shows that tai chi reduced insomnia symptoms in breast cancer survivors, suggesting that it may help with insomnia linked to other health problems, too.

Insomnia may respond to treatment with ashwagandha

An Ayurvedic Herb for Better Sleep

Might Ayurvedic medicine—traditional medicine practiced in India for 3,000 years—offer an effective treatment for insomnia?

If you’re looking for an alternative treatment vetted by scientists in controlled clinical trials, the answer is no. But an Indian herb called ashwagandha is receiving attention as a substance that might help people with several health conditions, including chronic stress, anxiety, and memory loss. It’s also being studied as a possible sleep aid. Here’s more about it.

Genetic variants may be an underlying factor in insomnia

Insomnia and Your Genes

If you suspect there’s a biological component to your insomnia, you’re probably right. Although talk about insomnia is mostly confined to situational triggers as well as habits and attitudes that keep insomnia alive, all models of chronic insomnia assume the existence of predisposing factors. Some of these factors may be inherited at birth.

What evidence is there for genetic involvement in insomnia, and where might it lead? A review published recently in Brain Sciences brings us up to date.

Insomnia sufferers may want to try a sleep aid called Zenbev Drink Mix, made from pumpkin seeds

Could Pumpkin Seeds + Carbs = Better Sleep?

Let’s begin with a caveat: no organic sleep aid on the market has been shown to cure insomnia.

But if you like warm, nonalcoholic, caffeine-free liquids, and if drinking a beverage is part of your evening routine, you might be interested in trying Zenbev Drink Mix. Here’s more information about it.

Insomnia may respond to acupuncture treatments

Acupuncture for Insomnia: An Update

This summer I saw a cousin of mine who lives in San Francisco. He was using acupuncture for insomnia and happy with the results.

I’ve always wondered about acupuncture as a potential treatment for insomnia, so now and then I check the literature. Here’s a summary of recent thinking about it.

Insomnia, alternative treatment tart cherry juice not so plentiful

Tart Cherries: Helpful to Sleep but Harder to Find?

First, the good news: a small body of research suggests that tart cherry juice holds promise as an alternative treatment for insomnia, especially in older adults.

Now for the bad news: tart cherry juice, already pricey, is set to become pricier still as growers weigh whether to give up on cherries and plant apple trees instead. Here’s more on the benefits of tart cherry juice for sleep and why it may soon become scarce.

menopausal symptoms respond to acupuncture & isoflavones

Relief for Hot Flashes and Menopausal Insomnia

About 40 to 50 percent of women experience insomnia before and after menopause. Add hot flashes, mood swings, and fatigue into the mix, and riding out “the change” can be tough.

Recent reviews suggest that acupuncture and isoflavones (plant-derived compounds that function like estrogen) may be effective as alternative treatments for menopausal insomnia and hot flashes.

Before sleep restriction, keep a sleep diary for a week to ensure success

Q&A: Start Sleep Restriction Right for Best Results

“I’m on Day 4 of SRT and it isn’t going well,” Jenny wrote recently. “I finally had an appointment with a sleep therapist last week. He talked to me about SRT and gave me a 7-hour sleep window, from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. My usual bedtime is 9:30 so I had some apprehensions. But I started 4 days ago.

“Since then I haven’t slept more than 3 hours a night. It’s really hard for me to stay up till 11, and then when I get in bed I’m wide awake! In the morning I’m so tired I can hardly keep my eyes open! Is this normal? I’m afraid I may be a treatment failure. Any advice?”