More Gifts for the Sleepless

Looking for a gift for a problem sleeper (or are you browsing for sleep-friendly products yourself)? Last year’s holiday gift blog was so popular that I decided to post a similar blog this year.

Most of these items are fairly inexpensive and all can be purchased online. They may be helpful for people with insomnia and other sleep problems. If nothing else they’ll make for comfier nights.

Blue light-blocking glasses can be helpful for people with insomniaLooking for a gift for a problem sleeper (or are you browsing for sleep-friendly products yourself)? Last year’s holiday gift blog was so popular that I decided to post a similar blog this year.

Most of these items are fairly inexpensive and all can be purchased online. They may be helpful for people with insomnia and other sleep problems. If nothing else they’ll make for comfier nights.

Blue Light-Blocking Glasses: Evening use of computers and smartphones can suppress secretion of melatonin and make it harder to fall asleep. Blue-light blocking glasses keep this from happening. Night owls and people who use screens at night should use blue blockers in the evening. Night-shift workers should wear them when they leave work in the morning. Blublocker sells glasses for use outdoors for $49.95. Lenses suitable for both in- and outdoor use are available at LowBlueLights for $70 to $80.

Red Night-Lights: People who are sensitive to light and prone to insomnia should avoid light at night. But darkening the house completely is not always practical. The solution lies in using red lighting, which research shows is unlikely to have any effect on melatonin secretion or sleep. Brownsmark sells three red night-lights, made by Ibis & Orchid Design, for $19.99 apiece. Together with small red bulbs sold at hardware stores, the night-lights make pretty gifts.

Herbal Teas: The jury is still out on the question of how well herbal remedies work for insomnia. But teas containing kava, valerian and passionflower are believed to have anxiety-reducing, sleep-promoting properties. And simply drinking a warm beverage at night is a calming ritual. Yogi sells a “Rest & Relax Variety 6-Pack” for $28.14. For tea-drinking insomniacs, this is as good as it gets.

Calming Essential Oils: Last year’s blog featured lavender oil, found in some studies to relieve anxiety and help with sleep. Lavender is also found in some essential oil blends. DoTERRA’s Serenity contains a mix of lavender, Roman chamomile, ylang ylang, and other oils said to alleviate stress. Its subtle herbaceous smell makes for wonderfully fragrant nights. A 15 ml bottle sells for $40.

Warm Slipper Socks: Feeling too cold at night is never conducive to sleep, but sleep is most likely to occur when your core body temperature is falling. Warming the extremities hastens this process, dilating blood vessels, allowing for the swift release of body heat and in turn promoting slumber. So warm footwear is a must on winter nights. At $49.95 a pair, L.L.Bean’s fleece-lined knit slipper socks are the best I’ve found.

Travel Pillows: Sleeping on planes can be nearly impossible for the sleep challenged, but the right travel pillow can reduce the discomfort of sleeping in a seat. SkyMall offers a wide selection of inflatable pillows suitable for most sleeping positions: reclining backward, leaning to the side or slumping forward over a meal tray. The pillows sell for $20 to $40.

Sleep Tracking Devices: I’ll leave it to Joanna Stern of The Wall Street Journal to review the latest sleep monitors. Keep in mind that these gadgets were designed and work best for normal sleepers. They may not be able to deliver all they promise for people with insomnia. They start at $99.

The Savvy Insomniac: Give your loved one this A-to-Z guide to improving sleep and stamina. No other book about chronic insomnia presents as many solutions and explanations of why and when they’re likely to help. No other provides such insight into a disorder still widely misunderstood. The Savvy Insomniac now sells for $10.36 with free shipping in the US. There’s no better way to fight insomnia than this.

Still looking for the perfect gift? Take a look at last year’s holiday gift blog.

 

Press Release 9-26-13

FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 26, 2013
CONTACT: Lois Maharg, 734-424-1088, loismaharg@thesavvyinsomniac.com
Tired of Keeping Vigil at Night? New Book Offers Insight into Insomnia and Tools to Improve Sleep
ANN ARBOR, MI—September 26, 2013—A new book draws on personal experience and science to shed light on chronic insomnia and help poor sleepers get a good night’s rest.

FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

CONTACT: Lois Maharg, 734-424-1088, loismaharg@thesavvyinsomniac.com

Tired of Keeping Vigil at Night? New Book Offers Insight
into Insomnia and Tools for Better Sleep

ANN ARBOR, MI—September 26, 2013—A new book draws on personal experience and science to shed light on chronic insomnia and help poor sleepers get a good night’s rest.

In The Savvy Insomniac: A Personal Journey through Science to Better Sleep ($12.95, Fine Fettle Books, September 2013), journalist Lois Maharg tours the world of the sleepless—visiting sleep clinics, researchers, therapists, conferences, and fellow insomniacs—in a quest for better sleep and daytime stamina. This book documents her journey and offers an array of strategies aimed at helping insomnia sufferers improve their sleep.

Thirty million Americans struggle with persistent insomnia, compromising their quality of life and long-term health. In The Savvy Insomniac: A Personal Journey through Science to Better Sleep, Maharg presents a state-of-the-art perspective on the causes and consequences of this frustrating and complex disorder, interweaving information about

  • The body systems that control sleep and waking
  • Cutting-edge research from leading sleep scientists
  • The history of insomnia and cultural attitudes toward it
  • The benefits—and risks—of sleeping pills
  • Insomnia treatments and new therapies in the pipeline.

“Many insomniacs have tried the sleep tips they see in magazines and on the web,” Maharg says. “They’re looking for solutions but haven’t found anything that works. Clearly they need more than quick answers. They also want to understand why, although they’re exhausted at night, they can’t turn off their brains. My book gives readers the knowledge base and the means to improve their nights and days.”

Lois Maharg has worked as a beat reporter and features writer in Pennsylvania and Michigan, writing on a variety of topics including health, exercise, and food. Her lifelong struggle with insomnia gave rise to this book. Her blog, The Savvy Insomniac, is dedicated to sharing new information about insomnia and sleep.

The Savvy Insomniac: A Personal Journey through Science to Better Sleep ($12.95, 320 pages, 5 ½ X 8 ½, paperback, ISBN 978-0-9894837-1-1) is available at http://www.thesavvyinsomniac.com and from online booksellers offering e-book versions as well ($3.99, ISBN 978-0-9894837-0-4).

###

CONTACT: Lois Maharg, 734-424-1088, loismaharg@thesavvyinsomniac.com

Download Press Release: PR 9-26-13