Tag: sleep aid

Insomnia may respond to treatment with ashwagandha

An Ayurvedic Herb for Better Sleep

Might Ayurvedic medicine—traditional medicine practiced in India for 3,000 years—offer an effective treatment for insomnia?

If you’re looking for an alternative treatment vetted by scientists in controlled clinical trials, the answer is no. But an Indian herb called ashwagandha is receiving attention as a substance that might help people with several health conditions, including chronic stress, anxiety, and memory loss. It’s also being studied as a possible sleep aid. Here’s more about it.

New guideline for sleeping pills may change doctors' prescribing habits

Sleeping Pills: New Prescribing Guidelines

Let’s say you go to the doctor hoping to get a prescription for sleeping pills to relieve your insomnia. You’ve been through cognitive behavioral therapy and it has helped. But there are nights when you’re wound up so tightly that nothing—push-ups, meditation, a hot bath—will calm you down enough so you can get a decent night’s sleep. What then?

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recently released a clinical practice guideline for the medical treatment of chronic insomnia in adults. Here’s what the academy now recommends.

Insomnia sufferers may want to try a sleep aid called Zenbev Drink Mix, made from pumpkin seeds

Could Pumpkin Seeds + Carbs = Better Sleep?

Let’s begin with a caveat: no organic sleep aid on the market has been shown to cure insomnia.

But if you like warm, nonalcoholic, caffeine-free liquids, and if drinking a beverage is part of your evening routine, you might be interested in trying Zenbev Drink Mix. Here’s more information about it.

Magnesium supplements may ease anxiety and improve sleep

Magnesium May Ease Insomnia and Anxiety

Last week a new friend was telling me about her sons. She has quite a bit of anxiety about their situation and, since reaching menopause, she’s had trouble sleeping. She tried sleeping pills and didn’t like the way they made her feel. But magnesium supplements seem to do the trick.

So I looked for research on magnesium, anxiety and insomnia and here’s what I found.

Insomnia more likely when relying on alcohol for sleep

Drinking to Get to Sleep

The story on alcohol and sleep is complicated. About 10 to 14 percent of adults in the United States use alcohol as a sleep aid. While it generally degrades the quality of sleep, the use of alcohol does not predict the development of persistent insomnia, say the authors of a large longitudinal study published in January 2012 in the journal Sleep. But—and here’s the troubling part—twice as many insomniacs become problem drinkers as people who sleep well.

Here is one woman’s story of how alcohol led to trouble sleeping and insomnia.