Anniversary Book Giveaway Marks Change in Blog

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Still blogging about insomnia—now, once a month

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Book Giveaway

First, heartfelt thanks to those of you who follow my blog. It’s one thing to visit a website now and then but quite another to sign up for news from a blogger who posts a 600- to 800-word story every week! Your interest in insomnia and insomnia treatments must be as deep and personal as mine.

For all the blogging I’ve done about sleep and insomnia, though, The Savvy Insomniac is the best and most comprehensive writing I’ve done on the subject. Anyone living in the US who hasn’t got a copy and wants one can use the contact form to let me know. The first 10 people who contact me with a question about sleep or insomnia (something you wonder about but haven’t found much information about) will get a copy of The Savvy Insomniac free of charge.

Don’t forget to include your mailing address. Overseas shipping rates are so exorbitant that I can’t ship books abroad. But inexpensive e-books continue to be available through Amazon and other online booksellers.

Here, now, are the blog topics most popular with Savvy Insomniac readers. Count on hearing more about them in the months ahead.

Insomnia Relief in the Form of a Pill

Sleeping pills don’t get great press these days, but they have great interest for Savvy Insomniac readers. Posts about Belsomra, the newest sleeping pill approved for the treatment of insomnia, consistently get the most views. Belsomra acts as a sedative by blocking transmission of orexin, a neurochemical that promotes arousal. Other orexin-blocking sleeping pills are in the works. I’ll write about them if and when they’re approved by the FDA.

Posts about sedating antidepressants are also popular. Since many sleeping pills have undesirable side effects, persistent insomnia is sometimes treated with low doses of a sedating antidepressant. Doxepin has been approved as Silenor for treatment of sleep maintenance insomnia. The others (trazodone, mirtazapine, amitriptyline) have not been sanctioned by the FDA as effective for insomnia. They do, however, have sedative properties.

Melatonin supplements are also of high interest to readers, especially in timed-release formulations. But melatonin is not a sleeping pill. Its usefulness lies in its ability to shift the timing of sleep. Melatonin is sometimes recommended to night owls whose daytime schedules make it necessary to go to sleep earlier than they would following their natural inclinations. It also helps lessen jet lag.

Insomnia: What’s Your Flavor?

Posts on the different types of insomnia are the next most visited category. Since the underlying causes of insomnia disorder remain unknown, insomnia is usually classified based on the symptoms people report.

Psychophysiologic (or psychophysiological) insomnia is the most common insomnia diagnosis given to those of us who report trouble sleeping at night and daytime impairments. Symptoms are both physiological (bodily tension and warmth, for example) and psychological (anxiety about sleep). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is now the first-line treatment for psychophysiologic insomnia.

A diagnosis of paradoxical insomnia may be made following a sleep study showing a large discrepancy between how much time a person reports sleeping and how much sleep is recorded on the polysomnogram (the test in the sleep lab). Treatment options vary and there’s no clear consensus on which works best.

Sleep Restriction for Insomnia Relief

Sleep restriction therapy comes in for a close third topic of interest to Savvy Insomniac readers. Offered as part of CBT-I or as a standalone therapy, sleep restriction has been found in research to improve several aspects of sleep.

Its appeal to readers of this blog may have to do with the sheer number of posts I’ve written on the topic (10) and the fact that it worked so well for me. Combined with daily exercise, sleep restriction helped me regularize my sleep and overcome my sleep anxiety. Invaluable gains, to me.

Seasonal Insomnia

Insomnia that varies seasonally is another topic that draws lots of readers. Environmental factors that occur in the spring and summer—too much light and too much heat—can easily interfere with falling and staying asleep.

Insomnia that starts in the fall and continues through the winter may be driven by other environmental factors. Lack of sunlight or other bright light is usually the culprit. Lack of vitamin D may be another factor. Expect to see an update on this topic coming fairly soon.

Don’t see a topic that interests you here? Use the contact form to ask a question about a topic that does interest you, and receive a free copy of The Savvy Insomniac.

And here’s a last request: please like and share blog posts you feel are helpful on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. This will help The Savvy Insomniac blog remain discoverable to other insomnia sufferers looking for a better night’s rest.

15 Tips for Better Sleep in the Summer

I love warm weather and long summer days. Birds singing, trees leafed out, garden thriving. Me, outside in shorts and a tee-shirt, able to appreciate the natural beauty till almost 10 p.m. What’s not to like?

Insomnia, in a word. On long, hot days I’m just not sleepy at my usual bedtime. I’m up later and later till—oops—I’m in the insomnia trap again.

You’d think I’d know by now: heat and light may boost my spirits but, in too big a dose, they’re a bane to sleep. So now it’s time to knuckle down and observe the rules for better sleep in the summer. Here they are:

Manage insomnia in the summer by cooling off & darkening the house
Here I am planting coleus in the iris bed.

I love warm weather and long summer days. Birds singing, trees leafed out, garden thriving. Me, outside in shorts and a tee-shirt, able to appreciate the natural beauty till almost 10 p.m. What’s not to like?

Insomnia, in a word. On long, hot days I’m just not sleepy at my usual bedtime. I’m up later and later till—oops—I’m in the insomnia trap again.

You’d think I’d know by now: heat and light may boost my spirits but, in too big a dose, they’re a bane to sleep. So now it’s time to knuckle down and observe the rules for better sleep in the summer. Here they are:

Reduce Exposure to Late Evening Light

I love the late evening light but it does not love me. One effect of light on sleep—especially light containing lots of blue light, such as sunlight and the light from devices with screens—is that it blocks release of the hormone melatonin. Melatonin secretion typically starts some two hours before bedtime. Exposure to daylight late in the evening may delay secretion, altering circadian rhythms and keeping us awake later than usual. If you’re light sensitive and looking for insomnia relief,

  1. Wear dark glasses if you’re out for an evening stroll.
  2. Don’t wait until the sun sets to darken your windows. Lower shades and close drapes by 8:30 p.m.
  3. Start your pre-sleep routine at the same time as usual—even if it’s still light outside.
  4. An hour or two before bedtime, get off computers, tablets and and smart phones. Blue-blocker glasses and apps that filter out blue wavelengths are supposed to make light less harmful at night. But I installed f.lux software on my computer and I still think looking at the screen after 9:30 or so has a negative effect on my sleep.

Reduce Exposure to Early Morning Light

Especially if you live at the eastern edge of a time zone, your problem may have to do with the early sunrise at this time of year. Sunlight may start streaming in the bedroom window and wake you up as early as 4:30 a.m. What a lousy start to a summer day! If early awakening is a problem and you’re after insomnia relief,

  1. Invest in a lightweight, light blocking eye mask.
  2. Install light blocking window treatments on bedroom windows and keep them drawn at night.
  3. Consider sleeping in a room with fewer windows around the time of the summer solstice.

Cool Your Bedroom Down in Advance

People with insomnia may have greater temperature sensitivity than good sleepers, or less ability to recognize what a comfortable ambient sleeping temperature is. Summer heat may be the cause of your trouble sleeping now—I know it’s a factor for me. If it feels too hot to sleep,

  1. Keep shades and drapes drawn during the daytime to block out heat from the sun.
  2. If you have air conditioning and want to save on energy during the daytime, turn the thermostat down a degree or two about a half hour before bedtime.
  3. In the absence of air conditioning, use a window fan. But don’t wait till bedtime to turn it on. Keep tabs on the temperature outside and, when it starts to drop, turn on the fan.
  4. If A/C and fans don’t do the trick, try sleeping on a lower level of the house.

Cool Yourself Down

People tend to fall asleep more easily when their core body temperature is falling, which normally it does at night. But research suggests that compared with good sleepers, people with insomnia may have more trouble downregulating internal temperature. If this is true, then especially in the summertime, it’s important to take measures to cool your body down before you go to bed. Research has shown that when done late in the afternoon or early in the evening,

  1. Exercise heats your body up, triggering an internal cooling mechanism that may later help you fall asleep.
  2. You can achieve the same delayed cooling effect by indulging in a warm shower, bath or sauna early in the evening.

But if at 11 p.m. you return to a hot house expecting to take a quick shower and hop into bed, it’s time for emergency measures:

  1. Turn on the A/C and/or fans full blast and take a cool shower.
  2. Place a cool, wet washcloth on your forehead when you finally turn in.

If you have trouble sleeping in the summer, what do you think is the cause of the problem?

Use Pillows Strategically for Pain-Free Nights

I know from experience that pillows can make a difference between a good night’s sleep and a bad one.

A reader suffering low back pain and insomnia wrote in with a question about pillows a few days ago, prompting me to do a little research. Here’s what I found out.

Insomnia and back pain can be alleviated by placing pillows correctlyThis morning I landed on a blog promoting use of a wooden pillow for intestinal health and insomnia relief. No joke. You’re supposed to lie face down with the “pillow” under your lower stomach and gently shake the abdominal area from side to side. This rocking motion supposedly helps with digestion and spinal alignment, relaxing you and helping you fall asleep.

Pardon my skepticism, but frankly the adjective wooden does not belong in the same sentence as insomnia relief. I’ve blogged about wooden pillows elsewhere and am no more convinced I should place one under my stomach than under my neck!

But I know from experience that pillows can make a difference between a good night’s sleep and a bad one. A reader suffering low back pain and insomnia wrote in with a question about pillows a few days ago, prompting me to do a little research. Here’s what I found out.

Low back Pain and Insomnia

That pain can interfere with sleep is a no-brainer. But there seems to be an especially tight and complex relationship between back pain and insomnia or disturbed sleep. Recent studies from Korea and the United Kingdom suggest that 43 to 47 percent of patients diagnosed with chronic low back pain or chronic back pain also suffer insomnia. A large study conducted in Japan found that low back pain is significantly associated with poor sleep quality and sleeping less than 6 hours a night.

Insomnia also places people at greater risk for the development of low back pain, Israeli researchers found recently. Other investigators have shown that just as low back pain can disturb sleep, so disturbed sleep tends to increase the intensity of pain. This creates a vicious circle: pain disturbs sleep, leading to greater pain, leading to further sleep disturbance, and on and on.

But strategic placement of pillows can alleviate back pain by straightening out the spine and keeping it in alignment, relieving pressure on pain-sensitive areas and creating conditions where you’re more likely to get a decent night’s rest.

Stomach Sleepers

If you like sleeping on your stomach, the pillow supporting your head and neck should be fairly flat. If it’s got too much loft, you wind up sleeping with your neck cranked too far to the side, torquing the upper spine and straining muscles in the neck.

Straighten out the lower spine by sleeping with another fairly flat pillow under your stomach.

Back Sleepers

The pillow supporting your head, neck, and shoulders should be thicker if you prefer sleeping on your back. In its natural position, the human neck curves slightly forward, say doctors writing on spine-health.com. This curve should be maintained during sleep. A too-high or too-low pillow causes muscle strain in the neck. It can also obstruct breathing and result in snoring.

To straighten out the spine in the lower back, take one or more thick pillows and place them under your knees. Flattening out the spine this way relieves pressure on the pain-sensitive joints in the lumbar area.

Side Sleepers

If you prefer to sleep on your side, the pillow supporting your head and neck should be fairly thick. Otherwise the upper spine will be unnaturally bent.

Use of a knee pillow is critical for side sleepers with low back pain. Side sleepers often sleep with bent knees, and without use of a knee pillow, there’s a tendency for the upper leg to fall forward, twisting the lower spine and aggravating lumbar pain. Placing a small, firm pillow between the knees straightens out the spine and will allow for greater comfort and a better night’s rest.

I’m a side sleeper myself, and to avoid low back pain I use a variation of this suggested to me by a physical therapist. Instead of positioning my legs one on top of the other, I pull my top knee forward so it’s at right angles with my torso and place the knee on a small, thick pillow. This helps me sleep through the night and wake up in the morning pain free. Sleeping on the left side in this position is recommended for pregnant women, too.

Pillows flatten out over time and may cease to provide the support you need. My husband teases me about running through pillows likes hotcakes, but expert opinion is on my side. When your pillow loses its loft, it’s time to add stuffing or buy a new one.