Does Insomnia Look as Bad as We Think?

I recently attended a talk where the speaker, a photographer, posed a question to the audience. “If you took a series of photos of yourself going about your daily life,” she asked, “are there images you’d feel uncomfortable sharing with other people?”

The first image that came to mind was my face as it must look the minute I crawl out of bed after a slew of insomniac nights. That face isn’t pretty. But would signs of sleep deprivation show up in a photograph?

Fatigue and sleep deprivation show up in the eyes, skin, and mouthI recently attended a talk where the speaker, a photographer, posed a question to the audience. “If you took a series of photos of yourself going about your daily life,” she asked, “are there images you’d feel uncomfortable sharing with other people?”

The first image that came to mind was my face as it must look the minute I crawl out of bed after a slew of insomniac nights, when I’m feeling sleep deprived. (Bouts of insomnia are rare now, but they can still occur if I’m stressed out for several days.) The face I imagine isn’t pretty: furrowed brow; pained eyes; skin that’s inelastic, exposing crow’s feet and other wrinkles that show my age; mouth turned down.

I’m not the only insomniac to imagine the worst. Amy, a stay-at-home mom I interviewed for my book, is convinced after nights of insomnia that she looks like a mess. “I feel like I’ve got black circles under my eyes,” she says. “I feel like my whole aura is going to be sort of repulsive in the world. I don’t even want to go out the door I feel so icky.”

But would the icky way we feel after insomniac nights show up in a photograph, or are we just imagining we look so bad?

The Facts of the Matter

A study from Sweden and The Netherlands confirms that telltale signs of insufficient sleep can be read in the face. When people are severely sleep deprived (in this case, subjects underwent a short night’s sleep followed by a completely sleepless night), it shows up in their eyes, skin, and mouth, and as sadness.

The subjects in this study were probably way more sleep deprived than most people with insomnia. In fact, sleep deprivation may not be the real problem for some insomniacs at all.

Still, alongside other findings, this study adds to the literature suggesting that inadequate sleep not only jeopardizes our health and day-to-day functioning. It can also make us less attractive. (And who thinks this concern is superficial? Not me!)

Facial Cues of Sleep Deprivation

  • Tired eyes are the most revealing sign of fatigue. Drooping eyelids and eyes that are red or swollen are a tip-off that you’re short on sleep.
  • Skin cues are telling, too. All the usual suspects—pale skin, wrinkles, and dark circles under the eyes—are validated in this study as signs of sleep deprivation.
  • Finally, drooping corners of the mouth and overall sadness are marks of fatigue and insufficient sleep.

The take-away? You’ve known it all along. Everything your mother ever told you about your need for beauty sleep is absolutely true.

Does your face look different when you’re short on sleep? How?

The Skinny on Your Skin and Sleep

A new study has shown that sleep quality affects the health and appearance of human skin. Researchers found that the skin of poor sleepers showed increased signs of aging and a slower ability to recover from scratches and exposure to the sun.

Fatigue and sleep deprivation show up in the eyes, skin, and mouthFor years I’ve wondered if my sleep problems have affected my skin. Dark circles under the eyes—the classic sign of a bad night—have never been my particular trouble. But I’ve got other skin complaints: cuts that take a long time to heal, and white marks from nicks and scratches that never go away.

A new study conducted at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland has shown that sleep quality does indeed affect the health of human skin. Researchers found that the skin of poor sleepers showed increased signs of aging and a slower ability to recover from scratches and exposure to the sun.

“Our study is the first to conclusively demonstrate that inadequate sleep is correlated with reduced skin health and accelerates skin aging,” said lead researcher Elma Baron in a University Hospitals press release on July 17.

How the Study Was Conducted

Sixty women ages 30 to 49 participated in this study, funded by Estee Lauder. Half of them were good sleepers and the other half reported sleeping poorly.

At the start of the experiment, researchers made a visual inspection of each woman’s skin. Then the women underwent several procedures such as UV light exposure and skin barrier disruption. Investigators then observed them to see how quickly their skin recovered from these challenges.

Beauty Queens, Beware

The results aren’t pretty for those of us with insomnia. Poor sleepers

  • showed increased signs of skin aging including fine lines, uneven pigmentation, slackening of skin, and reduced elasticity
  • took significantly longer to recover from sun exposure, with redness remaining higher over 72 hours.

After a tape-stripping procedure, “the recovery of good quality sleepers was 30 percent higher than poor quality sleepers . . . demonstrating that they repair the damage more quickly.”

So what’s an aging insomniac to do? Well, if preserving our skin is important, then taking measures to improve our sleep would surely be the best defense. Me, I’m heading over to the make-up counters at Macy’s. Estee Lauder never looked so good.

Do you think your skin is affected by the quality of your sleep? How?