Tag: cognitive-behavioral therapy

CBT for insomnia should be your no. 1 resolution for the new year

2017: Resolve to Improve Your Sleep

Do you have a persistent sleep problem? Make cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia your No. 1 New Year’s resolution for 2017.

Here’s what you stand to gain, what may stand in the way, and where to find help.

Insomnia sufferers can get help from sleep specialists and CBT providers

Find the Right Sleep Doctor for Insomnia

When people write in with lots of questions about insomnia, I’ll often recommend seeing a sleep specialist or a sleep therapist who can provide cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I).

But finding sleep specialists and sleep therapists can be tricky. Here’s why you might want to consult one and how to locate the right provider.

Psychophysiologic insomnia is a sleep problem involving physical and mental factors

Psychophysiologic Insomnia: What It Is & How to Cope

Psychophysiologic insomnia: This was my diagnosis when I finally decided to see a doctor about my sleep. I didn’t like the sound of it. “Psycho” came before “physiologic,” and to me the implication was that my trouble sleeping was mostly in my head.

My insomnia felt physical, accompanied as it was by bodily warmth, muscle tension, and a jittery feeling inside. I was anxious about sleep, too, and my thoughts weren’t exactly upbeat. But surely putting the psycho before the physiologic was putting the cart before the horse?

Brief insomnia treatment involves setting later bedtime at night

An Insomnia Treatment in Brief

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is now the gold standard in drug-free treatments for insomnia. The benefits are often long lasting.

Researchers have created and are now testing a briefer form of CBT-I called brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI). BBTI isn’t widely available yet. But with health insurance companies clamoring for providers to rein in costs, BBTI is the wave of the future.

cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, must I give up sleeping pills?

Q&A: During CBT, Do I Have to Stop My Sleep Meds?

A long-term user of sleeping pills wrote to Ask The Savvy Insomniac with questions about cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia. “Before I go through CBT, will I have to give up my sleeping pills? I’d like to get off them eventually, but every time I think of doing it I freak out.”

Recently I looked into research on insomnia sufferers going through CBT while at the same time tapering off (or reducing reliance on) sleeping pills. What I found was encouraging.

Ease Insomnia by Changing Negative Thoughts

Could simply changing your thoughts about insomnia lead to better sleep? Some sleep therapists claim it works this way. They promote a process called “cognitive restructuring,” typically offered as part of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia. It involves identifying negative thoughts about sleep and then challenging them. The goal is to wind up with thoughts that are more sleep friendly.

Sounds like a tall order, right? I agree. I’ll say up front that I had limited success with it myself. But the experts say this exercise is helpful for many who struggle with chronic insomnia. You may be one.

sleep restriction often leads to mild sleep deprivation

Surviving Sleep Restriction

A new study confirms that in the early weeks of treatment, sleep restriction—a part of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia—really is a cross to bear.

Seems like a no-brainer to me. But in research, quantification is important, and what these UK researchers have done is actually a good thing. (I’ll explain why later on.) Here are five tips for insomnia sufferers planning to undergo treatment.

Depression responds to treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia

The Insomnia-Depression Connection Writ Large

Insomnia doesn’t often get front-page coverage, but it did on Tuesday. Benedict Carey of The New York Times reported on a study of people under treatment for depression. The results showed that nearly twice as many subjects were cured of depression when—in addition to taking an antidepressant or a pill placebo—they received cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia.

It’s time to reassess the relationship between insomnia and depression.