Tag: CBT

Q&A: Can Poor Sleep Show in the Face?

Can chronic insomnia make you less attractive? speed up the aging of skin? cause irreversible damage to your face?

I heard these concerns as I interviewed insomniacs for my book. But recently I decided to check into them after receiving an email from a woman whose anxiety about her appearance was extreme:

Insomnia sufferers can get help from sleep specialists and CBT providers

Find the Right Sleep Doctor for Insomnia

When people write in with lots of questions about insomnia, I’ll often recommend seeing a sleep specialist or a sleep therapist who can provide cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I).

But finding sleep specialists and sleep therapists can be tricky. Here’s why you might want to consult one and how to locate the right provider.

Chronic insomniacs should avoid naps, but people whose sleep problems are less severe need not abstain

Insomnia and Napping: No One-Size-Fits-All Prescription

If you have insomnia, you’ve probably heard it’s best to avoid naps. Maybe you heard it from your doctor in a conversation about the rules of “good sleep hygiene,” or maybe you read it in a magazine. Is the advice to refrain from napping really sound advice and, if so, do you have to swear off napping completely to get a better night’s rest?

There are no one-size-fits-all answers to these questions, say researchers who recently reviewed the evidence behind the recommendation to avoid napping and other sleep-related do’s and don’ts. It depends on your age and situation.

Psychophysiologic insomnia is a sleep problem involving physical and mental factors

Psychophysiologic Insomnia: What It Is & How to Cope

Psychophysiologic insomnia: This was my diagnosis when I finally decided to see a doctor about my sleep. I didn’t like the sound of it. “Psycho” came before “physiologic,” and to me the implication was that my trouble sleeping was mostly in my head.

My insomnia felt physical, accompanied as it was by bodily warmth, muscle tension, and a jittery feeling inside. I was anxious about sleep, too, and my thoughts weren’t exactly upbeat. But surely putting the psycho before the physiologic was putting the cart before the horse?

Insomnia sufferers report anxiety at night, which may be reduced with exercise and other strategies.

Easing Worry and Anxiety about Sleep

Insomnia sufferers write to me often with complaints about sleep-related worry and anxiety.

“The more important the next day is to me, the harder it is for me to sleep,” Jessica says. “So I worry about not sleeping and then it turns into a self-fulfilling prophecy.”

Finding a solution to this problem can be tricky. It may require experimentation before you home in on a strategy that works.

Perfectionism may or may not be a predisposing factor to insomnia

The Insomnia/Perfectionism Connection

Do you hold yourself to high (sometimes impossibly high) standards? Do you tend to be self-critical and cringe at making mistakes? Is it even difficult sometimes to take pleasure in your own hard-won achievements?

These are signs of perfectionism, and perfectionists are more susceptible to insomnia than people who can shrug off their mistakes.

Can CBT for insomnia be used if you have bipolar disorder?

Q&A: Can Insomnia in Bipolar Disorder Be Treated with CBT?

Last week Dan wrote to Ask The Savvy Insomniac with questions about cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Dan has bipolar disorder, and because of this diagnosis, his sleep doctor had reservations about him undergoing CBT-I.

So Dan tried a modified version for 2 weeks. His sleep did not improve. He was wondering if he would have to use sleeping pills and if he should continue with CBT-I on his own.

Brief insomnia treatment involves setting later bedtime at night

An Insomnia Treatment in Brief

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is now the gold standard in drug-free treatments for insomnia. The benefits are often long lasting.

Researchers have created and are now testing a briefer form of CBT-I called brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI). BBTI isn’t widely available yet. But with health insurance companies clamoring for providers to rein in costs, BBTI is the wave of the future.