Tag: CBT for insomnia

Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia improves sleep & mood

Early Treatment of Insomnia May Improve Mental Health

Insomnia and mental health problems go hand in hand. It’s firmly established now that insomnia can be a causal factor in depression and that treatment for insomnia can improve both sleep and mood.

A new study shows that insomnia may also be a causal factor in psychotic experiences such as paranoia and hallucinations, and that CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) may lead to better mental health. Here’s a quick look at the research and what it suggests for us.

Paradoxical insomnia may respond to treatment with CBT & therapies lowering arousal

Paradoxical Insomnia: A Second Look at Treatments

Paradoxical insomnia: a diagnosis given to people whose sleep studies show they sleep a normal amount but who perceive they sleep much, much less. When I wrote about it in 2015, the word was that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)—the gold standard in treatments for insomnia—might not be an effective treatment for it.

But a brief testimonial that recently appeared in American Family Physician argues otherwise. Here’s an update on this puzzling sleep disorder.

Tai chi may improve sleep for insomnia sufferers with other health problems

Tai Chi When Insomnia Isn’t the Only Problem

Insomnia combined with other health problems is bound to cause distress.

But help is at hand. New research shows that tai chi reduced insomnia symptoms in breast cancer survivors, suggesting that it may help with insomnia linked to other health problems, too.

CBT for insomnia should be your no. 1 resolution for the new year

2017: Resolve to Improve Your Sleep

Do you have a persistent sleep problem? Make cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia your No. 1 New Year’s resolution for 2017.

Here’s what you stand to gain, what may stand in the way, and where to find help.

Anxiety about sleep is treatable with CBT for insomnia

Q&A: Will Regular Rest Curb Sleep Anxiety?

“I have nights when I can’t sleep at all and other nights when I sleep a lot,” Philippa wrote last week. “If I don’t fall asleep straight away I find I often don’t sleep the whole night! Do you think sleep restriction would work for me?”

My answer to Philippa’s question is an unqualified “yes.” But first I want to look at sleep that’s inconsistent and unpredictable and how anxious it can make you feel.

Insomnia sufferers should do something quiet at night until they're sleepy

Q&A: Panic About Insomnia Relapse

Lately I’ve been hearing from people who improved their sleep using sleep restriction or full-blown CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) and then experience a relapse. They have a few bad nights and fear they’ve lost all the gains they made. Here’s how one reader recently described her plight:

“I realize that sometimes I will get scared when I have one or two bad nights once in a while. I’m afraid that insomnia will haunt me once again. Is this normal? What can I do?”

Sleep Restriction: Up Close and Personal

Some insomnia sufferers who visit my website head straight for the posts on sleep restriction. So I decided to create a video trailer where I could talk about my own experience of sleep restriction: how off-putting the idea was at first, and the results I later achieved.