Some doctors are comfortable prescribing sleeping pills and others aren't

Doctors and the Sleeping Pill Question

The use of sleeping pills is on the rise, with 8 percent of Americans now using them at least a few nights a week. By some folks’ lights this is not a good thing. Doctors are too quick on the draw with the prescription pad, is a complaint I often hear.

But I’ve had more experience with doctors of the opposite persuasion, who declare they don’t do sleeping pills at all.

Short Sleep Affects Personality

Short sleep—sometimes defined as sleeping less than 6 hours a night, and other times defined as sleeping less than 5—is associated with a higher risk of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, investigators at Penn State Hershey have said. Some research has even shown there’s a link between short sleep and increased mortality.

Now a new study finds that short sleep also has effects on personality.

Awake in the Middle of the Night

The bed—so sleep experts maintain—should only be used for sleep and sex. People who can’t sleep should get up and do something: iron shirts, look at picture books, plan a backyard stupa. Anything, for God’s sake, but toss and turn among the sheets.

I know I should follow this advice. But every fiber of my body cries out for staying flat on my back.