Paradoxical insomnia may respond to treatment with CBT & therapies lowering arousal

Paradoxical Insomnia: A Second Look at Treatments

Paradoxical insomnia: a diagnosis given to people whose sleep studies show they sleep a normal amount but who perceive they sleep much, much less. When I wrote about it in 2015, the word was that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)—the gold standard in treatments for insomnia—might not be an effective treatment for it.

But a brief testimonial that recently appeared in American Family Physician argues otherwise. Here’s an update on this puzzling sleep disorder.

Insomnia can be relieved by focusing on stress reduction and self-care

Tips for Stressed-Out Caregivers Seeking Better Sleep

Occasionally I get emails from people with take-charge, type A personalities wondering what to do about insomnia. Full of self-reliance, they’ve often scoured the internet for remedies—and tried every one—or amassed a mountain of books about sleep—and read them all—to little avail. Can I suggest anything that might help?

Here is Geri’s story (abbreviated to save space) and my response.

Coffee | insomnia sufferers can enjoy health benefits & avoid the harms

Coffee: The Sleepless, Too, Can Enjoy the Benefits

I love coffee and I’m always glad to hear coffee is beneficial to my health. Two new studies—one of humans and the other of mice—add to this growing body of knowledge.

Yet coffee contains caffeine, and people with insomnia are often advised to cut down on caffeine because it interferes with sleep. Is there a middle course the sleepless can steer to avoid the harms and reap the benefits?

Proteins linked to Alzheimer's a function of insufficient deep sleep

Alzheimer’s Disease: Are You, Poor Sleeper, at Risk?

I talk quite a bit about dementia and Alzheimer’s disease with family and friends. Our parents are drifting into cognitive impairment, asking the same questions again and again and struggling to find words to express themselves, and we wonder if we’re destined for the same fate.

The concern may be justified in middle-aged adults with chronically poor sleep, according to new research on sleep and two proteins involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Here’s more about the study and its relevance to people with insomnia and other sleep disorders.

Causes of insomnia are closer to being figured out

7 New Insomnia Genes: What’s in It for Us

A flurry of articles recently announced the discovery of seven new risk genes for insomnia. In an era when new genes are being identified for everything from infertility to schizophrenia, you might regard this discovery as simply the soup du jour.

Not me. Growing up when trouble sleeping was attributed to psychological factors, coffee, and alcohol, I was elated by this news. We stand to gain so much from knowing the genetic underpinnings of insomnia.

Lifelong insomnia can be treated by sleep specialist or therapist

Lifelong Insomnia? Don’t Give Up on It Yet

Have you had insomnia all your life? Have your parents said you were a poor sleeper even as a baby?

Trouble sleeping that starts early in life is called idiopathic insomnia. If insomnia is still the black box of sleep disorders, then idiopathic insomnia is the little black box inside the black box.

Here’s what is known about the disorder and options for management.

Insomnia may respond to treatment with herbal supplements and tinctures

Herbals for Insomnia? Now You Can Test Them at Home

Herbal remedies for insomnia are abundant online—valerian, hops, and chamomile, among the most common. Tested against placebo, none has been found to be definitively effective for insomnia. Yet some medicinal herbs have a long history as traditional calming, sleep-promoting agents. Might one work for you?

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School have proposed a method you can use yourself to test herbal remedies via personalized therapeutic trials. Here’s more about herbals and how the trials work:

Manage insomnia in the summer by cooling off & darkening the house

15 Tips for Better Sleep in the Summer

I love warm weather and long summer days. Birds singing, trees leafed out, garden thriving. Me, outside in shorts and a tee-shirt, able to appreciate the natural beauty till almost 10 p.m. What’s not to like?

Insomnia, in a word. On long, hot days I’m just not sleepy at my usual bedtime. I’m up later and later till—oops—I’m in the insomnia trap again.

You’d think I’d know by now: heat and light may boost my spirits but, in too big a dose, they’re a bane to sleep. So now it’s time to knuckle down and observe the rules for better sleep in the summer. Here they are: