New Technology May Help Insomniacs Sleep

I don’t often write about technology developed to improve sleep. I’m frankly skeptical that most products could help me any more than the daily exercise I do and the habits I changed after going through CBT for insomnia.

But a few items have caught my attention recently because they sound like they have genuine potential to help—two I’ve blogged about before and one brand new. See if you agree.

Trouble sleeping alleviated with new devices and an appI don’t often write about technology developed to improve sleep. I’m frankly skeptical that most products (e.g., sleep trackers) could help me any more than the daily exercise I do and the habits I changed after going through CBT for insomnia.

But a few items have caught my attention recently because they sound like they have genuine potential to help—two I’ve blogged about before and one brand new. See if you agree.

High-Tech Earplugs

QuietOn Sleep earplugs were designed specifically to block out noises such as snoring and the droning of plane engines.

Earplugs—these or any others—may not interest you if you’re a homebody and/or you share a bed with a quiet sleeper. But if your sleep is often disturbed by a snoring partner or unpleasant, droning noises, these earplugs could be a real boon.

How They Work

QuietOn earplugs contain a microphone that continually samples sound in the environment. They then create a phase-shifted sound that’s played through a speaker, cancelling the exterior noise out. The earplugs are battery powered and come with a carrying case that functions as a charger.

You might not imagine all this technology could fit inside a gadget so small. Apparently, it does. Twenty-one of these earplugs can fit on a single credit card. Encased in soft material, they fit inside the ear canal, neither big enough to hurt you nor small enough to pop out.

The one downside is the price. While limited numbers are available via an Indiegogo campaign at $149 a pair (2 pairs for $199), the full price after product launch will be $239.

A Brain-Calming Headband

At last Ebb Therapeutics has come out with its novel insomnia therapy device, a headband that cools—and so calms—busy brains at night. Here’s why it might improve your sleep.

The brains of normal sleepers are quiet during sleep but insomniac brains are not. In neuroimaging studies, scientists have found evidence of excessive metabolic activity occurring in our brains at night. Some of it occurs in the frontal cortex, located behind the forehead. By cooling the forehead, Ebb Insomnia Therapy reduces activity in the front part of the brain and in turn makes it easier to fall asleep.

How It Works

The headband has a special pad that rests against the forehead. This pad is continuously supplied with cooling fluid via a tube connecting the headband to a temperature regulator that sits on your bedside table.

The circulating fluid eventually evaporates and, after about three months, the temperature regulator alerts you to the fact that the fluid cartridge needs to be replaced. The replacement kit contains a forehead pad and a fluid cartridge.

How and Where to Get One

You need a prescription to get one; they’re not sold over the counter. However, Ebb Therapeutics, planning to market the devices widely, says they’re now available at sleep centers in these cities:

  • Atlanta, GA
  • Clayton, NC
  • Fargo, ND
  • Newark, DE
  • Pittsburgh, PA
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Rehobeth Beach, DE
  • St. Louis, MO
  • St. Petersburg, FL
  • Wilmington, DE
  • Wilson, NC

For a review of how this device may improve sleep and the tests that went into its development, see my earlier post on Ebb Insomnia Therapy. Contact the company directly to find out how much the device (and replacement kit) costs.

A Sleep Training Smartphone App

You might not think sleep could improve with training. Michael Schwartz thinks otherwise, based on years of work as a sleep technologist and sleep educator. He’s developed an inexpensive smartphone app called Sleep On Cue that can help people fall asleep and fall back to sleep more quickly.

The idea behind the app is this: Chronic insomnia often gives rise to anxiety about sleep, lack of confidence in sleep ability, negative beliefs about sleep, and increased brain activity at night. So it’s easy to lose touch with the feeling of falling asleep. The app essentially retrains you to recognize what falling asleep feels like, alleviating anxiety about sleep and restoring your confidence in your sleep ability.

How the App Works

You conduct your sleep training sessions late in the afternoon or early in the evening after a poor night’s sleep. Lie in bed holding your smartphone. Via a simple call-and-response procedure involving soft tones and movement, the app detects when you’re falling asleep (although you may not).

To the question “Do you think you fell asleep?” you press “yes” or “no.” Then, you leave the bed a few minutes, awaiting the next sleep trial. When you decide to end your session, your phone displays a graph with feedback about your sleep ability and your awareness of your sleep. Gradually you get better at recognizing the feeling of falling asleep.

For details about the procedure and the testing behind it, see my earlier post about Sleep On Cue or go directly to the product website.

Transitioning to Menopause? Don’t Give Up on Sound Sleep

I often hear sleep complaints from women approaching menopause. Hot flashes and mood swings are other common complaints. What can be done to improve sleep and reduce perimenopausal symptoms?

The key, say authors of a review paper published this year, is to use a variety of approaches based on individual women’s symptoms, history and needs.

Insomnia and hot flashes can be relieved with multi-pronged treatmentI often hear sleep complaints from women approaching menopause. Hot flashes and mood swings are other common complaints. What can be done to improve sleep and reduce perimenopausal symptoms?

The key, say authors of a review paper published this year, is to use a variety of approaches based on individual women’s symptoms, history and needs.

Sleep Problems in the Menopausal Transition

The transition to menopause begins 4 to 6 years before menstruation stops (the median age for menopause is 51 years). It’s a time of fluctuating reproductive hormone levels. Not all women suffer ill effects during this period but many do.

Sleep problems are one of the most common complaints, reported by up to 56% of women approaching menopause, say authors of the review, published in the journal Nature and Science of Sleep. In turn, trouble sleeping often compromises midlife women’s quality of life, mood and productivity.

There’s an uptick in sleep-disordered breathing (sleep apnea) among women transitioning to menopause. There’s also an uptick in insomnia. A study involving 982 perimenopausal women interviewed by phone found that 26% had symptoms qualifying them for a diagnosis of insomnia disorder as medically defined.

Not Just in Our Heads

Fluctuating levels of hormones—follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol (an estrogen) and progesterone—likely play a role in insomnia that occurs during the menopausal transition. Hot flashes, too, which typically emerge as estrogen levels decline, are associated with poorer reported sleep quality and chronic insomnia.

As for objective evidence of menopausal sleep problems, results of population studies of midlife women involving polysomnography (PSG) are inconsistent. But in a recent study published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, investigators found “stark differences in PSG measures in women with, relative to women without, insomnia disorder developed in the menopausal transition.”

Women who developed insomnia during the menopausal transition

  • had poorer sleep efficiency
  • experienced more wakefulness after sleep onset
  • had shorter total sleep time, with 50% sleeping less than 6 hours
  • were more likely to have hot flashes, which predicted their number of awakenings per hour of sleep.

A Role for Depression and Stress

Symptoms of depression typically increase during the menopausal transition. Depression and insomnia are closely linked, with depression sometimes preceding insomnia and insomnia sometimes leading to depression. The results of one interesting study suggest that trouble falling asleep at the beginning of the night is associated with anxiety while nonrestorative sleep is linked to depression.

Chronic exposure to stress could be another factor in midlife women’s greater susceptibility to insomnia. And during the transition to menopause, traits associated with insomnia—increased tendency toward rumination, anxiety, generalized hyperarousal, stress reactivity, and neuroticism—are similar to tendencies predictive of hot flashes and other perimenopausal symptoms.

Treatments for Insomnia in the Menopausal Transition

Since insomnia in the menopausal transition is likely due to many factors, it’s challenging to treat. The reviewers recommend “flexible and individualized” treatments for insomnia depending on each woman’s current symptoms and history.

Hormone Therapy

Hormone therapy generally improves sleep quality in women who experience hot flashes during the transition. It may be a good option if, based on a woman’s history and health concerns, the overall potential benefits outweigh the risks. The reviewers note that abrupt discontinuation of hormone therapy is associated with hot flash relapse, which could in turn lead to insomnia.

Non-Hormonal Pharmacological Therapies

Sleeping pills, which are generally prescribed for short-term or intermittent use, are not a front-line treatment for insomnia in perimenopausal women. Taken nightly over time, many sleeping pills degrade sleep quality and have other negative effects. Following are the medications the reviewers suggest considering for perimenopausal women with insomnia and hot flashes:

  • Low-dose selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors—such as citalopram (Celexa) and escitalopram (Lexapro)—and low-dose serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors—such as duloxetine (Cymbalta) and venlafaxine (Effexor XR). Note that discontinuation of SSRIs is associated with hot flash relapse, which could lead to insomnia.
  • Gabapentin, shown to improve sleep quality in perimenopausal women with hot flashes and insomnia.
Non-Pharmacological Therapies
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the overall gold standard in drug-free treatments for insomnia. In a randomized clinical trial recently conducted on peri- and postmenopausal women experiencing at least 2 hot flashes daily, women who underwent CBT-I “had significantly greater reduction in insomnia symptoms and greater improvements in self-reported sleep quality” compared with controls. The improvements were maintained at 6 months after treatment.
  • Soy isoflavones—phytoestrogens found mainly in legumes and beans—have been shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce menopausal symptoms, including self-reported sleep disturbance. They’re available as dietary supplements.
  • High-intensity exercise and yoga are reported by the reviewers to be modestly beneficial in reducing menopausal symptoms and improving sleep.

Because many factors can combine to disrupt sleep in the period leading up to menopause—sleep disorders, mood disorders, medical conditions, and life stressors—no one-size-fits-all treatment will improve sleep and minimize menopausal symptoms. Instead, the reviewers recommend a multi-pronged approach to treatment based on individual women’s needs.

Was My Insomnia Due to Lack of Light?

A daily routine and daily exposure to sunlight help regulate sleep. Research backs this up and I see it in myself. My best sleeps come after days when I get up and out and do the things I do at the usual time.

Last night my sleep went off the rails, and I’m convinced the problem was at least partly related to light. Let me explain.

Insomnia can develop with too little exposure to daylightA daily routine and daily exposure to sunlight help regulate sleep. Research backs this up and I see it in myself. My best sleeps come after days when I get up and out and do the things I do at the usual time.

Last night my sleep went off the rails, and I’m convinced the problem was at least partly related to light. Let me explain.

An Unusual Tiredness

My husband and I were viewing old slides last night, and around 9 p.m. I complained about how tired I was.

“Why?” he asked. Normally at 9 p.m. my evening has barely begun.

I couldn’t explain it. I’d gotten up at the regular time, had coffee, eaten regular meals. Worked in the morning, exercised late in the afternoon. Had a glass of wine before dinner and a decent night’s sleep the night before. Nothing that came to mind could explain how really bone tired I felt.

Staving Off Sleep

Even so, I didn’t go to bed right away. If I’ve learned anything about sleep, it’s that going to bed early can start people like me on a path to perdition. It can lead to:

  • Sleep onset insomnia, or trouble falling asleep at the beginning of the night
  • Sleep maintenance insomnia, or broken sleep with awakenings every hour or two
  • Early awakening insomnia, or waking up in the twos, threes, or fours and being unable to fall back to sleep

So tired though I was, I headed for my favorite easy chair, where I typically read for a couple hours until I’m sleepy enough to fall asleep. Then at some point I went to bed.

A Short Night—Or Was It?

The next thing I knew I woke up in the dark and it felt like morning. I hurried to turn off the alarm clock because my husband was going to sleep in. But when I looked at the time (my clock stays dark at night except when I press the button on top) I saw it wasn’t even close to 5:30, my normal wake-up time. It was only 2:15.

So I went back to bed. At the next awakening, I asked my husband what time it was and he whispered it was almost 5:30. I turned off the alarm.

Only it wasn’t 5:30, and I didn’t turn off the alarm, I later learned from my husband. That whispered exchange must have been a dream. Because when I went downstairs and turned on a light, the clock on the stove said 4 a.m.

What the heck?!

I’d thought my early awakening insomnia was a thing of the past. It was so far from normal now that I was determined to parse it out.

Reconstructing My Day

Two clues lay beside the easy chair where I sat down to read last night.

  • My book: It was open two pages beyond the bookmark, where I’d stopped reading the night before. Guess I didn’t read for very long!
  • Medicine I take every night to help with digestion: Two capsules lay on the desk beside the chair together with a full glass of water, untouched.

Obviously I’d fallen asleep in my chair way earlier than usual. But what had knocked me out so quickly and completely that I forgot to take my medicine? Read just two pages when normally I’d read for at least two hours?

Was Lack of Light the Culprit?

Suddenly it came to me. I had done something out of the ordinary in the middle of the afternoon. I went to a concert, where for two hours I sat under low light listening to Haydn string quartets.

That wasn’t all: the first violinist was super-animated as he played and kept swinging his feet up into the air. Every time those feet came off the ground I thought of a plane taking off, and that image juxtaposed onto the Haydn was jarring. I decided to close my eyes—and kept them closed for the rest of the concert.

So for two hours in the afternoon, at a time when my brain would normally be exposed to light, I sat in near-total darkness. That, added to our half-hour session viewing slides in a dark living room, might have affected my body clock, causing sleepiness to occur earlier than usual and early morning wake-ups.

Bright Light Exposure: Rules to Live By

As ubiquitous as it is, light might not seem like it would have much impact on sleep. But it does. People contending with circadian rhythm disorders have to pay special attention to light, and light or a lack thereof may figure in insomnia, too. Keep these things in mind:

  • Lack of sufficient light exposure during the daytime tends to have a negative effect on sleep duration and sleep quality. Get exposure to sunlight every day by spending time outside or inside near a window.
  • Exposure to bright light early in the morning will help you fall asleep earlier.
  • Exposure to bright light in the evening tends to delay the onset of sleep.

 

The To-Do List: A Sleep-Friendly Bedtime Activity?

If you’ve got insomnia, you’ve probably heard of “worry lists.” Sleep doctors for years have been urging insomniacs to write our worries down before going to bed, claiming this will alleviate anxiety and sleep will come more easily.

Really? Write about looming deadlines and all the upcoming functions I have to prepare for before I go to bed? That’s sure to send my anxiety through the roof! (not to mention keeping me up for hours).

But the idea may not be as counterproductive as it sounds.

Insomnia because you're worried about tomorrow? Make a to-do-list in the eveningIf you’ve got insomnia, you’ve probably heard of “worry lists.” Sleep doctors for years have been urging insomniacs to write our worries down before going to bed, claiming this will relieve anxiety and sleep will come more easily.

Really? Write about looming deadlines and all the upcoming functions I have to prepare for before I go to bed? That’s sure to send my anxiety through the roof! (not to mention keeping me up for hours).

But the idea may not be as counterproductive as it sounds, a new study suggests.

Nighttime Challenges for Insomniacs

No one likes arguments or bad days at work, but experiences like these can be doubly disruptive for people with insomnia. At night these upsetting events cycle over and over in your head, making it hard—sometimes impossible—to sleep.

Likewise, it can be hard to sleep when you’re looking at challenges ahead. Tests to study for, deadlines to meet, presentations to deliver, events to organize, flights to catch—any unfinished business, especially lots of it, can keep you wakeful long into the night.

Could making a to-do list before going to bed relieve anxiety about tasks ahead and enable sleep to come more quickly? The jury is still out concerning insomnia sufferers per se. But a new study of healthy, normal sleepers conducted at Baylor University and Emory University Medical School suggests it might be helpful.

Polysomnography and a Pencil-and-Paper Task

This study—the first part of a larger study—was simple in design. Participants were recruited on campus and screened for various disorders, including sleep disorders. Sixty participants aged 18–30 were chosen (three were later disqualified). They were randomly divided into two groups.

The evening of the study, participants in both groups went to a sleep lab, where technicians prepared them to undergo an overnight sleep study, wiring them up for polysomnography.

After that, participants in one group were given a sheet of paper and told to spend the next five minutes writing down everything they had to do the next day and in the next few days. Participants in the other group were given a sheet of paper and told to spend five minutes writing down everything they’d accomplished that day and in the past few days.

The sheets were then collected. Lights went out at 10:30 p.m., and participants’ cerebral activity was monitored through the night.

To-Do List More Helpful Than List of Accomplishments

The results were all significant:

  • Participants who made a to-do list at bedtime fell asleep faster than those who wrote about completed tasks. (On average, the to-do list makers fell asleep in about 16 minutes while the others who listed accomplishments fell asleep in about 25 minutes.)
  • Among participants who made the to-do list, the greater the number of items on their list, the faster they fell asleep.

So making a detailed to-do list might actually be a good activity to add to your wind-down routine at night.

Results in Perspective

Other studies suggest these findings aren’t as unusual as they may seem. Researchers studying adults in highly stressful situations, such as having a son or daughter diagnosed with cancer, found that the more specifically parents could map out concrete steps they were going to take to contend with the child’s problem, the less stressed out they felt. Another study showed that first-time pregnant women who could simulate in detail how their labor would go were less worried than women that were less successful in simulating labor.

But back to doctors’ advice about worry lists: It seems to me there’s a difference between a worry list and a to-do list. The one sounds problem focused while the other is focused on solutions—which may make a difference in their effects.

At any rate, if you have insomnia and at night your mind is constantly drifting toward tomorrow and all the things you have to do, try writing down the steps you’re going to take to make things happen before you get in bed. It might relieve your anxiety and slow your busy brain just enough to hasten sleep.

Anniversary Book Giveaway Marks Change in Blog

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Still blogging about insomnia—now, once a month

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Book Giveaway

First, heartfelt thanks to those of you who follow my blog. It’s one thing to visit a website now and then but quite another to sign up for news from a blogger who posts a 600- to 800-word story every week! Your interest in insomnia and insomnia treatments must be as deep and personal as mine.

For all the blogging I’ve done about sleep and insomnia, though, The Savvy Insomniac is the best and most comprehensive writing I’ve done on the subject. Anyone living in the US who hasn’t got a copy and wants one can use the contact form to let me know. The first 10 people who contact me with a question about sleep or insomnia (something you wonder about but haven’t found much information about) will get a copy of The Savvy Insomniac free of charge.

Don’t forget to include your mailing address. Overseas shipping rates are so exorbitant that I can’t ship books abroad. But inexpensive e-books continue to be available through Amazon and other online booksellers.

Here, now, are the blog topics most popular with Savvy Insomniac readers. Count on hearing more about them in the months ahead.

Insomnia Relief in the Form of a Pill

Sleeping pills don’t get great press these days, but they have great interest for Savvy Insomniac readers. Posts about Belsomra, the newest sleeping pill approved for the treatment of insomnia, consistently get the most views. Belsomra acts as a sedative by blocking transmission of orexin, a neurochemical that promotes arousal. Other orexin-blocking sleeping pills are in the works. I’ll write about them if and when they’re approved by the FDA.

Posts about sedating antidepressants are also popular. Since many sleeping pills have undesirable side effects, persistent insomnia is sometimes treated with low doses of a sedating antidepressant. Doxepin has been approved as Silenor for treatment of sleep maintenance insomnia. The others (trazodone, mirtazapine, amitriptyline) have not been sanctioned by the FDA as effective for insomnia. They do, however, have sedative properties.

Melatonin supplements are also of high interest to readers, especially in timed-release formulations. But melatonin is not a sleeping pill. Its usefulness lies in its ability to shift the timing of sleep. Melatonin is sometimes recommended to night owls whose daytime schedules make it necessary to go to sleep earlier than they would following their natural inclinations. It also helps lessen jet lag.

Insomnia: What’s Your Flavor?

Posts on the different types of insomnia are the next most visited category. Since the underlying causes of insomnia disorder remain unknown, insomnia is usually classified based on the symptoms people report.

Psychophysiologic (or psychophysiological) insomnia is the most common insomnia diagnosis given to those of us who report trouble sleeping at night and daytime impairments. Symptoms are both physiological (bodily tension and warmth, for example) and psychological (anxiety about sleep). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is now the first-line treatment for psychophysiologic insomnia.

A diagnosis of paradoxical insomnia may be made following a sleep study showing a large discrepancy between how much time a person reports sleeping and how much sleep is recorded on the polysomnogram (the test in the sleep lab). Treatment options vary and there’s no clear consensus on which works best.

Sleep Restriction for Insomnia Relief

Sleep restriction therapy comes in for a close third topic of interest to Savvy Insomniac readers. Offered as part of CBT-I or as a standalone therapy, sleep restriction has been found in research to improve several aspects of sleep.

Its appeal to readers of this blog may have to do with the sheer number of posts I’ve written on the topic (10) and the fact that it worked so well for me. Combined with daily exercise, sleep restriction helped me regularize my sleep and overcome my sleep anxiety. Invaluable gains, to me.

Seasonal Insomnia

Insomnia that varies seasonally is another topic that draws lots of readers. Environmental factors that occur in the spring and summer—too much light and too much heat—can easily interfere with falling and staying asleep.

Insomnia that starts in the fall and continues through the winter may be driven by other environmental factors. Lack of sunlight or other bright light is usually the culprit. Lack of vitamin D may be another factor. Expect to see an update on this topic coming fairly soon.

Don’t see a topic that interests you here? Use the contact form to ask a question about a topic that does interest you, and receive a free copy of The Savvy Insomniac.

And here’s a last request: please like and share blog posts you feel are helpful on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. This will help The Savvy Insomniac blog remain discoverable to other insomnia sufferers looking for a better night’s rest.

Early Treatment of Insomnia May Improve Mental Health

Insomnia and mental health problems go hand in hand. It’s firmly established now that insomnia can be a causal factor in depression and that treatment for insomnia can improve both sleep and mood.

A new study shows that insomnia may also be a causal factor in psychotic experiences such as paranoia and hallucinations, and that CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) may lead to better mental health. Here’s a quick look at the research and what it suggests for us.

Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia improves sleep & moodInsomnia and mental health problems go hand in hand. It’s firmly established now that insomnia can be a causal factor in depression and that treatment for insomnia can improve both sleep and mood.

A new study shows that insomnia may also be a causal factor in psychotic experiences such as paranoia and hallucinations, and that CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) may lead to better mental health. Here’s a quick look at the research and what it suggests for us.

Sleep and Mood: An Intimate Relationship

People with mood disorders and other mental health problems often experience insomnia. Until recently their trouble sleeping was viewed as a symptom or a consequence of the mental health problem. Successful treatment of that problem would take care of the insomnia, too—or so they thought.

Then along came research that upset the apple cart. It showed that insomnia was sometimes a causal factor in depression, and that treatment with CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) helped to resolve both problems better than treatment for depression alone. This led to a related question: could other psychiatric symptoms linked with insomnia—paranoia, hallucinations, anxiety, mania—be triggered in part by insomnia and could treatment with CBT-I head off their development?

A Large-Scale Study

Paranoia and hallucinations have strong links to insomnia. Researchers in the UK recruited 3,755 university students with insomnia from 26 different college campuses to see if treating their insomnia with CBT-I would lessen their risk of experiencing these psychotic symptoms.

Randomly the researchers divided student participants into two equal groups. One served as a control group. Students in the other group participated in an individualized online insomnia treatment program called Sleepio.

Similar to other research-based online insomnia treatments (SHUTi and CBT for Insomnia, for example), Sleepio is a 6-week program that delivers CBT-I over the internet. It includes behavioral components such as sleep restriction and stimulus control; cognitive components that challenge unhelpful beliefs; and education about sleep and sleep hygiene.

Student participants in both groups also took a battery of pencil and paper tests at four different times during the 6-month study period to assess the severity of their insomnia symptoms and the state of their mental health. Statistical analysis of the data included looking at whether reductions in insomnia symptoms correlated with better mental health outcomes.

Insomnia Treatment Improves Sleep, Reduces Psychotic Symptoms

Here are the main results, all statistically signficant. Compared with participants in the control group, participants who underwent the Sleepio treatment ended the program with

  • greatly improved sleep
  • fewer experiences of paranoia and hallucinations

The Take-Away

The results of this relatively large study led to the following claims:

  1. Online insomnia treatment programs like Sleepio work for university-age students with trouble sleeping. They’re inexpensive and can be accessed at home.
  2. While insomnia might not be the principal cause of psychotic experiences, it may well be a contributing cause.
  3. CBT-I may have promise as an early intervention for some psychiatric problems.

Caveats for the Sleepless Whether or Not Mental Health Is an Issue

CBT-I, for all its effectiveness, involves commitment to a weeks-long process and the discipline to follow a rigorous set of guidelines. In this study there was a 50% drop-out rate among participants assigned to the Sleepio program—higher than the dropout rate for the control group. Feeling sleep deprived and lacking stamina, some insomniacs may be unsuccessful at completing a CBT-I program in the absence of face-to-face coaching and encouragement from a trained sleep therapist.

But 50% of the participants stuck with the Sleepio program long enough to reap sleep benefits. This success rate is comparable to that found in research on other web-based insomnia treatment programs.

Our options do not stop with online treatment programs. I’ve found it’s also possible to improve sleep by following instructions in books about CBT-I (see, for example, The Insomnia Workbook by Stephanie Silberman, The Insomnia Answer by Paul Glovinsky and Arthur Spielman, or chapter 8 of my book, The Savvy Insomniac). I myself used CBT-I to improve my sleep after reading a training guide for sleep therapists (Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia: A Session-by-Session Guide by Michael Perlis and colleagues).

Regardless of how it’s accessed, CBT-I remains our best defense against sleepless nights and draggy days—and it may also preserve our mental health and well-being.

If you’ve tried CBT-I, how did you access treatment and how useful was it in helping to improve your sleep?

Ebb Insomnia Therapy: The Silver Bullet We’ve Been Waiting For?

The company name has changed. So has the wearable part of this sleep-promoting medical device.

But the product launch at selected sleep centers is still set for the final months of 2017, with full production capacity expected next year. Here’s an update on a device that will add to research-based treatment options for people with insomnia.

Ebb Insomnia Therapy helps people fall asleep more quicklyThe company name has changed. So has the wearable part of this sleep-promoting medical device.

But the product launch at selected sleep centers is still set for the final months of 2017, with full production capacity expected next year. Here’s an update on a device that will add to research-based treatment options for people with insomnia.

What It Is

The Ebb Insomnia Therapy device was developed by Ebb Therapeutics (formerly Cerêve, Inc.). Worn at night, it consists of a soft headband (rather than the plastic cap envisioned last year) attached by a tube to a temperature regulator that sits on a bedside table. Fluid is continuously pumped through the part of the headband that rests against the forehead, cooling it down. Research has shown that by cooling the forehead, the device reduces metabolic activity in the front part of the brain and hastens the onset of sleep.

Excessive Brain Activity at Night

The bane of many insomnia sufferers at night is a mind that keeps going and going and doesn’t want to stop. Such thinking and other executive activities (planning, decision-making) are functions of the frontal cortex, or the front part of the brain, involving the metabolizing of glucose.

Functional brain imaging studies—movies of processes occurring in the brain—have shown that the brains of normal sleepers are mainly quiet at night. No activity is detected in the frontal areas. In contrast, imaging studies conducted by Ebb Therapeutics founder Eric Nofzinger have revealed a great deal of metabolic activity occurring at night in the brains of insomniacs, including activity in the frontal cortex. Published images show that at night, the brains of people with insomnia are “lit up like Christmas trees.”

Cooling the Brain

Why might cooling the brain help? For starters, our core body temperature tends to rise in the daytime and fall at night. Previous research has shown that we tend to fall asleep more readily when our core body temperature is on the downward part of the cycle.

Two early studies conducted on people with insomnia showed that cooling the forehead at night

  • reduced participants’ core body temperature, and
  • reduced metabolic activity in the brain, particularly in the frontal cortex.

When Nofzinger and colleagues conducted a third, larger study (randomized and placebo controlled), they found that wearing the device significantly reduced the amount of time it took insomnia sufferers to fall asleep.

Compared With Current Insomnia Treatments

Many medications for insomnia have unwanted side effects. Ebb Insomnia Therapy is reported to have no appreciable side effects and classified as low risk by the FDA. As for its effectiveness, only time will tell how well it stacks up against insomnia drugs such as Ambien and Belsomra. New insomnia treatments like Ebb are only required to perform significantly better than sham treatment or placebo pill to gain FDA approval.

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), currently the gold standard in insomnia treatments, requires effort and commitment to a rigorous, weeks-long therapeutic process. Ebb Insomnia Therapy is relatively effortless. All it involves is wearing a headband at night. Some insomnia sufferers may begin to benefit right away, according to the company website. Others may take time to adjust to the device and need to use it anywhere from 2 to 4 weeks before seeing sleep improvements.

Limitations

The device will not be sold over the counter. It requires a prescription from a licensed physician or a licensed nurse practitioner. Nor has Ebb Therapeutics said how much it will cost. The company has taken out several patents, though, so the device will not be cheap. In addition, a new fluid cartridge will need to be purchased every three months. The device and cartridges are not expected to be reimbursable by health insurance companies anytime in the near future.

It’s doubtful the device will solve the sleep problems of every insomniac. The studies show that Ebb Insomnia Therapy reduces the time it takes to fall asleep and users report, after 30 days, that it improves sleep quality. Nowhere is the company claiming the device cuts down on night-time wake-ups or increases total sleep time, two items on the wish list of many insomnia sufferers.

Even so, it may be the silver bullet that at least some insomniacs have been waiting for. Particularly if you feel your sleep problem is driven by a yammering brain that just won’t stop, Ebb Insomnia Therapy is certainly worth checking out.

Six Tips for Overcoming Sleep Onset Insomnia

Poor sleeping conditions such as those found on planes can interfere with anyone’s sleep. But sleep onset insomniacs may find them particularly challenging, accustomed as we are to not falling asleep very quickly and being bothered by things that other sleepers readily tune out.

Why is it so hard for some insomniacs to fall asleep and what can help? Following are six ways to hold sleep onset insomnia at bay.

Poor sleep conditions compound the problem of sleep onset insomniaIt’s been 10 years since I experienced persistent sleep onset insomnia, but I was reminded of what my nights used to feel like when recently I took a red-eye flight on Spirit Airlines.

Conditions on that plane were not conducive to sleep: seats locked in the upright position; flight attendants whose nattering could be heard over the noise of the engines; dim lighting rather than darkness; kicks to my seat as the 6-footer behind me shifted around in his coach class cubicle; turbulence. I didn’t sleep a wink.

Conditions like these can interfere with anyone’s sleep. But sleep onset insomniacs may find them particularly challenging, accustomed as we are to not falling asleep very quickly and being bothered by things that other sleepers readily tune out.

Why is it so hard for some insomniacs to fall asleep and what can help? Following are six ways to hold sleep onset insomnia at bay.

What Brain Waves Reveal About Insomnia

Research has shown that people with insomnia have a different pattern of cortical activity as we’re drifting off to sleep. Compared with good sleepers, insomniacs are more prone to high-frequency brain waves in the sleep onset period. Once sleep onset has occurred, delta, or slow, waves take longer to appear. This is often taken as evidence of hyperarousal. At night, and possibly during the daytime as well, people with insomnia have higher levels of cortical arousal.

Results of recent study argue otherwise. Here, in the sleep onset period, sleep onset insomniacs were found to experience less high-frequency brain activity than sleep maintenance insomniacs (those who tend to wake up in the middle of the night). But the high-frequency activity in the sleep onset insomniacs took longer to decline. Authors of this study suggest that sleep onset insomnia may be the result of “some form of fast wakefulness inhibition” rather than an expression of cortical hyperarousal.

Relief for Sleep Onset Insomnia

Whatever may be the case, habits I’ve developed over the past 10 years enable me to fall asleep quickly now (barring nights when I’m trying to sleep on a plane). They may help you, too:

  1. Adopt a regular sleep schedule. Be especially regular about getting up at the same time every day—even on weekends. This can be a challenge if you have an erratic daytime schedule or an active social life. If you find you’re really sleepy, catch up on sleep by allowing yourself to go to bed somewhat earlier than normal rather than sleeping in late. The problem with sleeping much later than usual to catch up on sleep is that it sets you up for trouble falling asleep the next night.
  2. Break the association between your bed and wakefulness by reserving your bed (and the bedroom) for sleep and sex. Reading, TV and movie watching, surfing the net, playing video games—all this should happen outside the bedroom. Only go to bed when you’re sleepy enough to fall asleep.
  3. Exercise late in the afternoon or early in the evening. Exercise warms your body up. This triggers an internal cooling mechanism, and when your body is cooling down it’s easier to fall asleep. Aerobic exercise is best but rigorous strength training may work as well.
  4. Observe a wind-down routine in the hour leading up to bedtime. Have the same routine—shower, put on pajamas, brush teeth, read or look at picture books—every night. Your brain will learn to expect that this sequence of activities ends in sleep.
  5. If clock watching at night makes you anxious, turn your clocks to the wall starting at about 9 or 10 p.m. Use a backlit alarm clock on your bedside table—the kind that stays dark at night except when you press the button on top.
  6. If you have to fly at night, arm yourself beforehand with all the accoutrements I forgot to pack in my carry-on: neck pillow, eye mask, earplugs. As for Spirit Airlines, they may say they’re the company with the newest fleet of planes, but seats that keep you locked in an upright position do not lend themselves to a good night’s sleep!

If you often fly at night, what measures do you take to get a decent night’s sleep?