Category: Remedies

Insomnia because you're worried about tomorrow? Make a to-do-list in the evening

The To-Do List: A Sleep-Friendly Bedtime Activity?

If you’ve got insomnia, you’ve probably heard of “worry lists.” Sleep doctors for years have been urging insomniacs to write our worries down before going to bed, claiming this will alleviate anxiety and sleep will come more easily.

Really? Write about looming deadlines and all the upcoming functions I have to prepare for before I go to bed? That’s sure to send my anxiety through the roof! (not to mention keeping me up for hours).

But the idea may not be as counterproductive as it sounds.

Anniversary Book Giveaway Marks Change in Blog

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia improves sleep & mood

Early Treatment of Insomnia May Improve Mental Health

Insomnia and mental health problems go hand in hand. It’s firmly established now that insomnia can be a causal factor in depression and that treatment for insomnia can improve both sleep and mood.

A new study shows that insomnia may also be a causal factor in psychotic experiences such as paranoia and hallucinations, and that CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) may lead to better mental health. Here’s a quick look at the research and what it suggests for us.

Ebb Insomnia Therapy helps people fall asleep more quickly

Ebb Insomnia Therapy: The Silver Bullet We’ve Been Waiting For?

The company name has changed. So has the wearable part of this sleep-promoting medical device.

But the product launch at selected sleep centers is still set for the final months of 2017, with full production capacity expected next year. Here’s an update on a device that will add to research-based treatment options for people with insomnia.

Poor sleep conditions compound the problem of sleep onset insomnia

Six Tips for Overcoming Sleep Onset Insomnia

Poor sleeping conditions such as those found on planes can interfere with anyone’s sleep. But sleep onset insomniacs may find them particularly challenging, accustomed as we are to not falling asleep very quickly and being bothered by things that other sleepers readily tune out.

Why is it so hard for some insomniacs to fall asleep and what can help? Following are six ways to hold sleep onset insomnia at bay.

Insomnia sufferers relearn the feeling of falling asleep

Sleep (Re)Training for Insomnia

What does falling asleep feel like? Good sleepers may never bother with the question. One minute they’re conscious and the next minute they’re out. But if you have chronic insomnia, falling asleep (or back to sleep) can feel like a tiresome slog.

Insomnia sufferers may actually lose touch with the feeling of falling asleep. So Sleep Technologist Michael Schwartz created a smartphone app to put people back in touch and increase their confidence and ease in falling asleep.

Melatonin content may differ from amount listed on label

How Much Melatonin Is Really in That Supplement?

Supplementary melatonin is the fourth most popular natural product used by adults in the United States and the second most popular given to children.

But supplements like melatonin are not subject to the same quality controls as prescription medications. A new study of melatonin sold over-the-counter shows that information on the label often does not reflect the content of the product.

Paradoxical insomnia may respond to treatment with CBT & therapies lowering arousal

Paradoxical Insomnia: A Second Look at Treatments

Paradoxical insomnia: a diagnosis given to people whose sleep studies show they sleep a normal amount but who perceive they sleep much, much less. When I wrote about it in 2015, the word was that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)—the gold standard in treatments for insomnia—might not be an effective treatment for it.

But a brief testimonial that recently appeared in American Family Physician argues otherwise. Here’s an update on this puzzling sleep disorder.