Category: Remedies

Insomnia sufferers may have increased temperature sensitivity at night

Q&A: Can’t Sleep Due to Temperature Sensitivity

A reader named Gunjan recently asked a question about trouble sleeping due to temperature changes at night. Here it is, lightly edited:

“It seems my body is very sensitive to temperature while I am sleeping. Many times it has happened that I went to bed at an optimal temperature. But as soon as my body sleeps, I wake up feeling too cold. Then I go to bed after switching off the fan or covering myself with the bed sheet but then I can’t sleep because I’m too hot. This is quite frustrating. . . . Does anybody . . . have any help to offer?”

Insomnia and mental decline can be alleviated with exercise

Exercise Improves Sleep, Preserves Mental Fitness

You may have been a couch potato for most of your life, but now, if you’re middle-aged and envisioning a healthy retirement, you’d better change your ways.

Moderate-to-vigorous exercise can mitigate some effects of aging, including poor sleep quality and cognitive decline. Research generally supports this claim, so especially if you’re prone to insomnia, you’ll want to check this out.

Insomnia may respond to treatment with ashwagandha

An Ayurvedic Herb for Better Sleep

Might Ayurvedic medicine—traditional medicine practiced in India for 3,000 years—offer an effective treatment for insomnia?

If you’re looking for an alternative treatment vetted by scientists in controlled clinical trials, the answer is no. But an Indian herb called ashwagandha is receiving attention as a substance that might help people with several health conditions, including chronic stress, anxiety, and memory loss. It’s also being studied as a possible sleep aid. Here’s more about it.

Insomnia may persist even after successful sleep apnea treatment

Insomnia or Sleep Apnea, or Both?

Let’s say that after years of experiencing insomnia you go in for a sleep study only to find out you have obstructive sleep apnea. Who knew? You’re outfitted with a breathing mask, you wear it as prescribed, and your sleep improves . . . somewhat.

But your insomnia symptoms are persistent, and you don’t have the kind of stamina you’d like during the day. What then?

Stress-related Insomnia can be alleviated with social support

Tips for Relieving Stress and Improving Sleep

Do stressful situations throw your sleep off track? You’d probably score high in sleep reactivity, a stable trait associated with insomnia. If a rough day at work kept you tossing and turning last night, then similarly charged situations—arguing with your spouse, getting bad news, preparing to speak in public—may disrupt your sleep now and then.

But what if the stress is chronic? Then it’s time to deal with it head on. Here are four ways to reduce stress and improve sleep.

Genetic variants may be an underlying factor in insomnia

Insomnia and Your Genes

If you suspect there’s a biological component to your insomnia, you’re probably right. Although talk about insomnia is mostly confined to situational triggers as well as habits and attitudes that keep insomnia alive, all models of chronic insomnia assume the existence of predisposing factors. Some of these factors may be inherited at birth.

What evidence is there for genetic involvement in insomnia, and where might it lead? A review published recently in Brain Sciences brings us up to date.

Sleep may be deeper and memory better by listening to timed exposure to pink noise at night

Pink Noise Enhances Sleep and Memory

An acoustic device may be able to accomplish for older adults what sleeping pills still cannot: enhance both sleep and memory.

Researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago conducted a study of 13 healthy older adults whose sleep deepened and whose recall of word pairs improved with timed acoustic stimulation at night. The discovery holds promise not just for older people with insomnia but also for everyone concerned about aging and memory impairment.

New guideline for sleeping pills may change doctors' prescribing habits

Sleeping Pills: New Prescribing Guidelines

Let’s say you go to the doctor hoping to get a prescription for sleeping pills to relieve your insomnia. You’ve been through cognitive behavioral therapy and it has helped. But there are nights when you’re wound up so tightly that nothing—push-ups, meditation, a hot bath—will calm you down enough so you can get a decent night’s sleep. What then?

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recently released a clinical practice guideline for the medical treatment of chronic insomnia in adults. Here’s what the academy now recommends.