Category: Recent Studies

Insomnia may respond to treatment with herbal supplements and tinctures

Herbals for Insomnia? Now You Can Test Them at Home

Herbal remedies for insomnia are abundant online—valerian, hops, and chamomile, among the most common. Tested against placebo, none has been found to be definitively effective for insomnia. Yet some medicinal herbs have a long history as traditional calming, sleep-promoting agents. Might one work for you?

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School have proposed a method you can use yourself to test herbal remedies via personalized therapeutic trials. Here’s more about herbals and how the trials work:

Sleeping pill users should read the label of OTC sleep medications

Use OTC Sleep Aids With Caution

The sleeping pill of choice for many Americans with insomnia can be purchased over the counter at drug and grocery stores. But a new study shows that many older adults who use OTC sleep aids know little about them and may be using them in ways that do more harm than good.

Insomnia sufferers should incorporate a bath into their bedtime routine

9 Ways to Keep Worry From Sabotaging Sleep

These days people are worried about jobs, health care, the environment, the possibility of worldwide war. Uncertainty about the future, and fear of negative outcomes, may rob even reliable sleepers of sleep from time to time.

But for many insomnia sufferers, worry and anxiety about sleep itself—“It’s two o’clock and I haven’t slept a wink!”; “If I don’t get to sleep now I’ll get sick!”—is an equally powerful enemy of sleep.

Here’s more about worry and insomnia and how to keep them from spoiling the night.

Tai chi may improve sleep for insomnia sufferers with other health problems

Tai Chi When Insomnia Isn’t the Only Problem

Insomnia combined with other health problems is bound to cause distress.

But help is at hand. New research shows that tai chi reduced insomnia symptoms in breast cancer survivors, suggesting that it may help with insomnia linked to other health problems, too.

Stress and poor sleep can lead to chronic insomnnia

A Different Pathway to Chronic Insomnia

Let’s say you grow up in a family of champion sleepers, yourself included. At college, you sail through rowdy dormitory life sleeping like a log. Job interviews, stressful to some, don’t faze you. By 27, you’ve landed a good job and in a few years earned enough for a down payment on a house. Sleep is still dependable and stays that way for a decade.

Then, coinciding with a move and the birth of a second child, you find yourself wide awake at your normal bedtime, staring at walls. Soon this becomes the rule rather than the exception. Before you know it you’ve developed chronic insomnia. How can sleep go from good to bad so quickly?

Insomnia and mental decline can be alleviated with exercise

Exercise Improves Sleep, Preserves Mental Fitness

You may have been a couch potato for most of your life, but now, if you’re middle-aged and envisioning a healthy retirement, you’d better change your ways.

Moderate-to-vigorous exercise can mitigate some effects of aging, including poor sleep quality and cognitive decline. Research generally supports this claim, so especially if you’re prone to insomnia, you’ll want to check this out.

Insomnia may respond to treatment with ashwagandha

An Ayurvedic Herb for Better Sleep

Might Ayurvedic medicine—traditional medicine practiced in India for 3,000 years—offer an effective treatment for insomnia?

If you’re looking for an alternative treatment vetted by scientists in controlled clinical trials, the answer is no. But an Indian herb called ashwagandha is receiving attention as a substance that might help people with several health conditions, including chronic stress, anxiety, and memory loss. It’s also being studied as a possible sleep aid. Here’s more about it.

Insomnia may persist even after successful sleep apnea treatment

Insomnia or Sleep Apnea, or Both?

Let’s say that after years of experiencing insomnia you go in for a sleep study only to find out you have obstructive sleep apnea. Who knew? You’re outfitted with a breathing mask, you wear it as prescribed, and your sleep improves . . . somewhat.

But your insomnia symptoms are persistent, and you don’t have the kind of stamina you’d like during the day. What then?