Anniversary Book Giveaway Marks Change in Blog

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Still blogging about insomnia—now, once a month

It’s time for a couple of announcements: The Savvy Insomniac came out four years ago today and we’re giving away 10 copies of the book to mark the occasion. Read on to find out how to get one yourself!

Announcement No. 2: I’ve been blogging weekly about insomnia for five years and now, starting in October, I’ll be posting once a month. I’m as committed as ever to offering news and perspective on issues related to sleep and insomnia. But other projects are calling and taking more time.

Here are the giveaway details. After that, a summary of popular blog topics you’ll hear more about in the future.

Book Giveaway

First, heartfelt thanks to those of you who follow my blog. It’s one thing to visit a website now and then but quite another to sign up for news from a blogger who posts a 600- to 800-word story every week! Your interest in insomnia and insomnia treatments must be as deep and personal as mine.

For all the blogging I’ve done about sleep and insomnia, though, The Savvy Insomniac is the best and most comprehensive writing I’ve done on the subject. Anyone living in the US who hasn’t got a copy and wants one can use the contact form to let me know. The first 10 people who contact me with a question about sleep or insomnia (something you wonder about but haven’t found much information about) will get a copy of The Savvy Insomniac free of charge.

Don’t forget to include your mailing address. Overseas shipping rates are so exorbitant that I can’t ship books abroad. But inexpensive e-books continue to be available through Amazon and other online booksellers.

Here, now, are the blog topics most popular with Savvy Insomniac readers. Count on hearing more about them in the months ahead.

Insomnia Relief in the Form of a Pill

Sleeping pills don’t get great press these days, but they have great interest for Savvy Insomniac readers. Posts about Belsomra, the newest sleeping pill approved for the treatment of insomnia, consistently get the most views. Belsomra acts as a sedative by blocking transmission of orexin, a neurochemical that promotes arousal. Other orexin-blocking sleeping pills are in the works. I’ll write about them if and when they’re approved by the FDA.

Posts about sedating antidepressants are also popular. Since many sleeping pills have undesirable side effects, persistent insomnia is sometimes treated with low doses of a sedating antidepressant. Doxepin has been approved as Silenor for treatment of sleep maintenance insomnia. The others (trazodone, mirtazapine, amitriptyline) have not been sanctioned by the FDA as effective for insomnia. They do, however, have sedative properties.

Melatonin supplements are also of high interest to readers, especially in timed-release formulations. But melatonin is not a sleeping pill. Its usefulness lies in its ability to shift the timing of sleep. Melatonin is sometimes recommended to night owls whose daytime schedules make it necessary to go to sleep earlier than they would following their natural inclinations. It also helps lessen jet lag.

Insomnia: What’s Your Flavor?

Posts on the different types of insomnia are the next most visited category. Since the underlying causes of insomnia disorder remain unknown, insomnia is usually classified based on the symptoms people report.

Psychophysiologic (or psychophysiological) insomnia is the most common insomnia diagnosis given to those of us who report trouble sleeping at night and daytime impairments. Symptoms are both physiological (bodily tension and warmth, for example) and psychological (anxiety about sleep). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is now the first-line treatment for psychophysiologic insomnia.

A diagnosis of paradoxical insomnia may be made following a sleep study showing a large discrepancy between how much time a person reports sleeping and how much sleep is recorded on the polysomnogram (the test in the sleep lab). Treatment options vary and there’s no clear consensus on which works best.

Sleep Restriction for Insomnia Relief

Sleep restriction therapy comes in for a close third topic of interest to Savvy Insomniac readers. Offered as part of CBT-I or as a standalone therapy, sleep restriction has been found in research to improve several aspects of sleep.

Its appeal to readers of this blog may have to do with the sheer number of posts I’ve written on the topic (10) and the fact that it worked so well for me. Combined with daily exercise, sleep restriction helped me regularize my sleep and overcome my sleep anxiety. Invaluable gains, to me.

Seasonal Insomnia

Insomnia that varies seasonally is another topic that draws lots of readers. Environmental factors that occur in the spring and summer—too much light and too much heat—can easily interfere with falling and staying asleep.

Insomnia that starts in the fall and continues through the winter may be driven by other environmental factors. Lack of sunlight or other bright light is usually the culprit. Lack of vitamin D may be another factor. Expect to see an update on this topic coming fairly soon.

Don’t see a topic that interests you here? Use the contact form to ask a question about a topic that does interest you, and receive a free copy of The Savvy Insomniac.

And here’s a last request: please like and share blog posts you feel are helpful on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. This will help The Savvy Insomniac blog remain discoverable to other insomnia sufferers looking for a better night’s rest.

Early Treatment of Insomnia May Improve Mental Health

Insomnia and mental health problems go hand in hand. It’s firmly established now that insomnia can be a causal factor in depression and that treatment for insomnia can improve both sleep and mood.

A new study shows that insomnia may also be a causal factor in psychotic experiences such as paranoia and hallucinations, and that CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) may lead to better mental health. Here’s a quick look at the research and what it suggests for us.

Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia improves sleep & moodInsomnia and mental health problems go hand in hand. It’s firmly established now that insomnia can be a causal factor in depression and that treatment for insomnia can improve both sleep and mood.

A new study shows that insomnia may also be a causal factor in psychotic experiences such as paranoia and hallucinations, and that CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) may lead to better mental health. Here’s a quick look at the research and what it suggests for us.

Sleep and Mood: An Intimate Relationship

People with mood disorders and other mental health problems often experience insomnia. Until recently their trouble sleeping was viewed as a symptom or a consequence of the mental health problem. Successful treatment of that problem would take care of the insomnia, too—or so they thought.

Then along came research that upset the apple cart. It showed that insomnia was sometimes a causal factor in depression, and that treatment with CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) helped to resolve both problems better than treatment for depression alone. This led to a related question: could other psychiatric symptoms linked with insomnia—paranoia, hallucinations, anxiety, mania—be triggered in part by insomnia and could treatment with CBT-I head off their development?

A Large-Scale Study

Paranoia and hallucinations have strong links to insomnia. Researchers in the UK recruited 3,755 university students with insomnia from 26 different college campuses to see if treating their insomnia with CBT-I would lessen their risk of experiencing these psychotic symptoms.

Randomly the researchers divided student participants into two equal groups. One served as a control group. Students in the other group participated in an individualized online insomnia treatment program called Sleepio.

Similar to other research-based online insomnia treatments (SHUTi and CBT for Insomnia, for example), Sleepio is a 6-week program that delivers CBT-I over the internet. It includes behavioral components such as sleep restriction and stimulus control; cognitive components that challenge unhelpful beliefs; and education about sleep and sleep hygiene.

Student participants in both groups also took a battery of pencil and paper tests at four different times during the 6-month study period to assess the severity of their insomnia symptoms and the state of their mental health. Statistical analysis of the data included looking at whether reductions in insomnia symptoms correlated with better mental health outcomes.

Insomnia Treatment Improves Sleep, Reduces Psychotic Symptoms

Here are the main results, all statistically signficant. Compared with participants in the control group, participants who underwent the Sleepio treatment ended the program with

  • greatly improved sleep
  • fewer experiences of paranoia and hallucinations

The Take-Away

The results of this relatively large study led to the following claims:

  1. Online insomnia treatment programs like Sleepio work for university-age students with trouble sleeping. They’re inexpensive and can be accessed at home.
  2. While insomnia might not be the principal cause of psychotic experiences, it may well be a contributing cause.
  3. CBT-I may have promise as an early intervention for some psychiatric problems.

Caveats for the Sleepless Whether or Not Mental Health Is an Issue

CBT-I, for all its effectiveness, involves commitment to a weeks-long process and the discipline to follow a rigorous set of guidelines. In this study there was a 50% drop-out rate among participants assigned to the Sleepio program—higher than the dropout rate for the control group. Feeling sleep deprived and lacking stamina, some insomniacs may be unsuccessful at completing a CBT-I program in the absence of face-to-face coaching and encouragement from a trained sleep therapist.

But 50% of the participants stuck with the Sleepio program long enough to reap sleep benefits. This success rate is comparable to that found in research on other web-based insomnia treatment programs.

Our options do not stop with online treatment programs. I’ve found it’s also possible to improve sleep by following instructions in books about CBT-I (see, for example, The Insomnia Workbook by Stephanie Silberman, The Insomnia Answer by Paul Glovinsky and Arthur Spielman, or chapter 8 of my book, The Savvy Insomniac). I myself used CBT-I to improve my sleep after reading a training guide for sleep therapists (Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia: A Session-by-Session Guide by Michael Perlis and colleagues).

Regardless of how it’s accessed, CBT-I remains our best defense against sleepless nights and draggy days—and it may also preserve our mental health and well-being.

If you’ve tried CBT-I, how did you access treatment and how useful was it in helping to improve your sleep?

Insomnia: Are Primary Care Doctors Still Getting It Wrong?

It’s not always easy to find help for insomnia. Several people I interviewed for “The Savvy Insomniac” reported that their primary care doctors didn’t seem to take the complaint seriously or prescribed treatments that didn’t work.

I thought the situation must have changed since persistent insomnia is now known to be associated with health problems down the line. But a recent report on the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system shows that insomnia is still overlooked and undertreated by many primary care providers.

Here’s what you may find—and what you deserve—when you talk to your doctor about sleep.

Insomnia is not always treatable by primary care providersIt’s not always easy to find help for insomnia. Several people I interviewed for “The Savvy Insomniac” reported that their primary care doctors didn’t seem to take the complaint seriously or prescribed treatments that didn’t work.

I thought the situation must have changed since persistent insomnia is now known to be associated with health problems down the line. But a recent report on the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system shows that insomnia is still overlooked and undertreated by many primary care providers.

Here’s what you may find—and what you deserve—when you talk to your doctor about sleep.

Insomnia Addressed in Primary Care

Investigators surveyed 51 primary care providers (PCPs) in the VA system as to their perceptions and treatment of insomnia. About 80% of the respondents said they felt insomnia was as important as other health problems. Yet they tended to underestimate its prevalence and often failed to document its presence.

Other research has shown that the prevalence of poor sleep quality among veterans is extremely high: over 70% in veterans without mental illness and even higher in veterans with a mental health diagnosis. Yet most PCPs surveyed estimated that only 20% to 39% of their patients experienced insomnia symptoms. When insomnia emerged as a problem, only 53% said they regularly entered it into their patients’ medical records.

Insomnia Conceived Of as Secondary Problem

Scientists now have plenty of evidence that insomnia is a disorder in its own right—regardless of whether it occurs alone or together with another disorder. Yet many PCPs seemed to view it as merely a symptom or a condition secondary to another disorder.

All of the PCPs endorsed the belief that when insomnia occurs together with a health problem such as depression and PTSD, successful treatment of the depression or PTSD will eradicate the trouble sleeping. Current scientific evidence does not support this belief.

Insomnia Treated With Sleep Hygiene

The first-line insomnia treatment recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and other professional organizations is cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). CBT-I is available at VA facilities.

Even so, the insomnia treatment PCPs most often recommended to their patients was counseling on good sleep hygiene. But sleep hygiene doesn’t work as a stand-alone treatment for insomnia. What’s more, it may make the prospect of CBT-I less palatable, given that some CBT guidelines call for behavioral changes that resemble the rules of good sleep hygiene.

Still Getting It Wrong

It seems like primary care doctors are just as outdated in their conception and treatment of insomnia as they were 10 and 20 years ago. I’m not alone in voicing this concern. Here’s how Michael Grandner and Subhajit Chakravorty titled their commentary on the survey results: “Insomnia in Primary Care: Misreported, Mishandled, and Just Plain Missed.”

There’s no ambiguity here.

Help You Deserve From Your Doctor

Your PCP may be responsive to your complaint of insomnia and current in his or her knowledge of how to diagnose and treat the condition. If so, well and good.

But your doctor may not be quite so on the ball when it comes to dealing with trouble sleeping. Don’t let that deter you from seeking help for insomnia elsewhere. A good doctor will:

  1. Respond to concerns about insomnia as attentively as he or she would to concerns about double vision or shortness of breath. Insomnia can be debilitating, and chronic insomnia can result in changes that compromise health and quality of life. A doctor who dismisses it as trivial or hands you the rules for good sleep hygiene before waving you out the door is not the right doctor.
  2. Ask questions about the duration, frequency, and severity of your problem, and possible underlying conditions. This type of inquiry is crucial to arriving at an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Doctors who don’t have the time or knowledge to ask these questions should refer you to someone who does.
  3. Discuss treatment options that are research based and individualized. CBT-I may require referral to a specialist, yet there may be no specialist certified in behavioral sleep medicine practicing in the area. Likewise, a prescription for sleeping pills is useless to a patient who has no intention of filling it. Treatment discussions should be dialogs, and doctors should encourage patient participation.

This is the kind of response we deserve when we bring up the topic of insomnia with PCPs.

But it may not be the kind of response we get. How has your doctor reacted when you’ve mentioned trouble sleeping? (If you found this post helpful, please like and share on social media. Thanks!)

Ebb Insomnia Therapy: The Silver Bullet We’ve Been Waiting For?

The company name has changed. So has the wearable part of this sleep-promoting medical device.

But the product launch at selected sleep centers is still set for the final months of 2017, with full production capacity expected next year. Here’s an update on a device that will add to research-based treatment options for people with insomnia.

Ebb Insomnia Therapy helps people fall asleep more quicklyThe company name has changed. So has the wearable part of this sleep-promoting medical device.

But the product launch at selected sleep centers is still set for the final months of 2017, with full production capacity expected next year. Here’s an update on a device that will add to research-based treatment options for people with insomnia.

What It Is

The Ebb Insomnia Therapy device was developed by Ebb Therapeutics (formerly Cerêve, Inc.). Worn at night, it consists of a soft headband (rather than the plastic cap envisioned last year) attached by a tube to a temperature regulator that sits on a bedside table. Fluid is continuously pumped through the part of the headband that rests against the forehead, cooling it down. Research has shown that by cooling the forehead, the device reduces metabolic activity in the front part of the brain and hastens the onset of sleep.

Excessive Brain Activity at Night

The bane of many insomnia sufferers at night is a mind that keeps going and going and doesn’t want to stop. Such thinking and other executive activities (planning, decision-making) are functions of the frontal cortex, or the front part of the brain, involving the metabolizing of glucose.

Functional brain imaging studies—movies of processes occurring in the brain—have shown that the brains of normal sleepers are mainly quiet at night. No activity is detected in the frontal areas. In contrast, imaging studies conducted by Ebb Therapeutics founder Eric Nofzinger have revealed a great deal of metabolic activity occurring at night in the brains of insomniacs, including activity in the frontal cortex. Published images show that at night, the brains of people with insomnia are “lit up like Christmas trees.”

Cooling the Brain

Why might cooling the brain help? For starters, our core body temperature tends to rise in the daytime and fall at night. Previous research has shown that we tend to fall asleep more readily when our core body temperature is on the downward part of the cycle.

Two early studies conducted on people with insomnia showed that cooling the forehead at night

  • reduced participants’ core body temperature, and
  • reduced metabolic activity in the brain, particularly in the frontal cortex.

When Nofzinger and colleagues conducted a third, larger study (randomized and placebo controlled), they found that wearing the device significantly reduced the amount of time it took insomnia sufferers to fall asleep.

Compared With Current Insomnia Treatments

Many medications for insomnia have unwanted side effects. Ebb Insomnia Therapy is reported to have no appreciable side effects and classified as low risk by the FDA. As for its effectiveness, only time will tell how well it stacks up against insomnia drugs such as Ambien and Belsomra. New insomnia treatments like Ebb are only required to perform significantly better than sham treatment or placebo pill to gain FDA approval.

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), currently the gold standard in insomnia treatments, requires effort and commitment to a rigorous, weeks-long therapeutic process. Ebb Insomnia Therapy is relatively effortless. All it involves is wearing a headband at night. Some insomnia sufferers may begin to benefit right away, according to the company website. Others may take time to adjust to the device and need to use it anywhere from 2 to 4 weeks before seeing sleep improvements.

Limitations

The device will not be sold over the counter. It requires a prescription from a licensed physician or a licensed nurse practitioner. Nor has Ebb Therapeutics said how much it will cost. The company has taken out several patents, though, so the device will not be cheap. In addition, a new fluid cartridge will need to be purchased every three months. The device and cartridges are not expected to be reimbursable by health insurance companies anytime in the near future.

It’s doubtful the device will solve the sleep problems of every insomniac. The studies show that Ebb Insomnia Therapy reduces the time it takes to fall asleep and users report, after 30 days, that it improves sleep quality. Nowhere is the company claiming the device cuts down on night-time wake-ups or increases total sleep time, two items on the wish list of many insomnia sufferers.

Even so, it may be the silver bullet that at least some insomniacs have been waiting for. Particularly if you feel your sleep problem is driven by a yammering brain that just won’t stop, Ebb Insomnia Therapy is certainly worth checking out.

Six Tips for Overcoming Sleep Onset Insomnia

Poor sleeping conditions such as those found on planes can interfere with anyone’s sleep. But sleep onset insomniacs may find them particularly challenging, accustomed as we are to not falling asleep very quickly and being bothered by things that other sleepers readily tune out.

Why is it so hard for some insomniacs to fall asleep and what can help? Following are six ways to hold sleep onset insomnia at bay.

Poor sleep conditions compound the problem of sleep onset insomniaIt’s been 10 years since I experienced persistent sleep onset insomnia, but I was reminded of what my nights used to feel like when recently I took a red-eye flight on Spirit Airlines.

Conditions on that plane were not conducive to sleep: seats locked in the upright position; flight attendants whose nattering could be heard over the noise of the engines; dim lighting rather than darkness; kicks to my seat as the 6-footer behind me shifted around in his coach class cubicle; turbulence. I didn’t sleep a wink.

Conditions like these can interfere with anyone’s sleep. But sleep onset insomniacs may find them particularly challenging, accustomed as we are to not falling asleep very quickly and being bothered by things that other sleepers readily tune out.

Why is it so hard for some insomniacs to fall asleep and what can help? Following are six ways to hold sleep onset insomnia at bay.

What Brain Waves Reveal About Insomnia

Research has shown that people with insomnia have a different pattern of cortical activity as we’re drifting off to sleep. Compared with good sleepers, insomniacs are more prone to high-frequency brain waves in the sleep onset period. Once sleep onset has occurred, delta, or slow, waves take longer to appear. This is often taken as evidence of hyperarousal. At night, and possibly during the daytime as well, people with insomnia have higher levels of cortical arousal.

Results of recent study argue otherwise. Here, in the sleep onset period, sleep onset insomniacs were found to experience less high-frequency brain activity than sleep maintenance insomniacs (those who tend to wake up in the middle of the night). But the high-frequency activity in the sleep onset insomniacs took longer to decline. Authors of this study suggest that sleep onset insomnia may be the result of “some form of fast wakefulness inhibition” rather than an expression of cortical hyperarousal.

Relief for Sleep Onset Insomnia

Whatever may be the case, habits I’ve developed over the past 10 years enable me to fall asleep quickly now (barring nights when I’m trying to sleep on a plane). They may help you, too:

  1. Adopt a regular sleep schedule. Be especially regular about getting up at the same time every day—even on weekends. This can be a challenge if you have an erratic daytime schedule or an active social life. If you find you’re really sleepy, catch up on sleep by allowing yourself to go to bed somewhat earlier than normal rather than sleeping in late. The problem with sleeping much later than usual to catch up on sleep is that it sets you up for trouble falling asleep the next night.
  2. Break the association between your bed and wakefulness by reserving your bed (and the bedroom) for sleep and sex. Reading, TV and movie watching, surfing the net, playing video games—all this should happen outside the bedroom. Only go to bed when you’re sleepy enough to fall asleep.
  3. Exercise late in the afternoon or early in the evening. Exercise warms your body up. This triggers an internal cooling mechanism, and when your body is cooling down it’s easier to fall asleep. Aerobic exercise is best but rigorous strength training may work as well.
  4. Observe a wind-down routine in the hour leading up to bedtime. Have the same routine—shower, put on pajamas, brush teeth, read or look at picture books—every night. Your brain will learn to expect that this sequence of activities ends in sleep.
  5. If clock watching at night makes you anxious, turn your clocks to the wall starting at about 9 or 10 p.m. Use a backlit alarm clock on your bedside table—the kind that stays dark at night except when you press the button on top.
  6. If you have to fly at night, arm yourself beforehand with all the accoutrements I forgot to pack in my carry-on: neck pillow, eye mask, earplugs. As for Spirit Airlines, they may say they’re the company with the newest fleet of planes, but seats that keep you locked in an upright position do not lend themselves to a good night’s sleep!

If you often fly at night, what measures do you take to get a decent night’s sleep?

Sleep (Re)Training for Insomnia

What does falling asleep feel like? Good sleepers may never bother with the question. One minute they’re conscious and the next minute they’re out. But if you have chronic insomnia, falling asleep (or back to sleep) can feel like a tiresome slog.

Insomnia sufferers may actually lose touch with the feeling of falling asleep. So Sleep Technologist Michael Schwartz created a smartphone app to put people back in touch and increase their confidence and ease in falling asleep.

Insomnia sufferers relearn the feeling of falling asleepWhat does falling asleep feel like? Good sleepers may never bother with the question. One minute they’re conscious and the next minute they’re out. But if you have chronic insomnia, falling asleep (or back to sleep) can feel like a tiresome slog.

Insomnia sufferers may actually lose touch with the feeling of falling asleep, some have claimed. So Sleep Technologist Michael Schwartz created a smartphone app to put people back in touch and increase their confidence and ease in falling asleep.

Racing Thoughts and Brain Activity at Night

An independent study has found the smartphone app, called Sleep On Cue, to be accurate at detecting the start, or onset, of sleep. But let’s step back, for a moment, and imagine a typical insomniac night.

It’s after midnight and you’re obsessing about your deadlines tomorrow. Or you’re thinking about how to fight your way out from under all your student loans. The next thing you know the clock on your bedside table says it’s 2 a.m. In desperation, you stare at the clock face, willing time to stop. By 3 a.m. you’re still awake and hopping mad about it!

Maybe you have spent the last 4 hours with your entire brain spinning along in problem-solving mode. Chances are, though, that if on such a night you were undergoing a sleep study, your brain waves would tell a somewhat different story. Beta waves, fast wave activity commonly observed in people who are are thinking and solving problems, might be mixed in with alpha waves (slower waves linked to more relaxed states) and even slower theta waves, heralding the start of Stage 1 sleep.

Detecting the Lighter Stages of Sleep

But would it feel like you were actually sleeping? Research has shown that people woken up in Stage 1 sleep are often unaware that they’ve been asleep. In this liminal state, people can drift back and forth between sleep and wakefulness for quite some time before descending further into more sustained sleep, which is called Stage 2.

Stage 2 sleep is characterized by a predominance of theta waves and by features called sleep spindles and K complexes. Awoken in Stage 2 sleep, people are somewhat more likely to be able to sense that they were asleep.

But people with insomnia may not be as apt to report they were sleeping. Investigators have speculated that with all the nighttime baggage accompanying chronic insomnia—anxiety about sleep loss, lack of confidence in sleep ability, negative beliefs about sleep, increased beta wave activity during sleep—some insomniacs may simply lose touch with the feeling of falling asleep.

A Sleep Training Smartphone App

When a call went out for an inexpensive way to detect the start of sleep at home, Schwartz developed Sleep On Cue. A recent study comparing it to polysomnography (the test used in overnight sleep studies) found that Sleep On Cue was accurate at predicting the onset of Stage 2 sleep.

Why is this important? For one thing, the app (which costs $4.99) may prove to be useful in helping to administer intensive sleep retraining—an insomnia treatment developed in Australia—inexpensively in people’s homes.

But for readers of this blog, the immediate value of this app may lie in its potential to train or retrain insomnia sufferers to recognize what falling asleep feels like. This could alleviate some of the worry and anxiety about sleep and insomnia and thus make it easier to fall asleep and fall back to sleep.

Here’s How the App Works

Sleep On Cue works best, Schwartz says, if you conduct your training sessions when the pressure to sleep is high: late in the afternoon or early in the evening after a poor night’s sleep.

  1. Lie down and relax in bed, holding your smartphone in one hand. The phone will periodically emit a soft tone. Every time you hear the tone, give the phone a slight shake.
  2. When the app no longer detects movement, it assumes you’re asleep. Then, the phone vibrates to wake you up.
  3. The screen then displays this message: “Do you think you fell asleep?” Press “yes” or “no.”
  4. Next, you’re instructed to leave the bed for a few minutes. The phone will then vibrate to let you know when to return to bed for the next sleep trial. In this way, you begin to relearn what falling asleep feels like and gain confidence in your ability to do it.
  5. You decide when to end each training session. The screen then displays a graph with feedback about your sleep ability and your awareness of your sleep.

Here’s a link to the Sleep On Cue website. At $4.99, it’s not much of an investment and the payoff could be great.

If you’ve tried Sleep On Cue, did it improve your sleep and, if so, how?

How Much Melatonin Is Really in That Supplement?

Supplementary melatonin is the fourth most popular natural product used by adults in the United States and the second most popular given to children.

But supplements like melatonin are not subject to the same quality controls as prescription medications. A new study of melatonin sold over-the-counter shows that information on the label often does not reflect the content of the product.

Melatonin content may differ from amount listed on labelSupplementary melatonin is the fourth most popular natural product used by adults in the United States and the second most popular natural product given to children. It can change the timing of sleep, ease jet lag, and help night owls shift to an earlier sleep schedule. Occasionally it’s used to correct a melatonin deficiency, or for insomnia (although for insomnia it’s unlikely to yield much benefit).

But supplements like melatonin are not subject to the same quality controls as prescription medications. A new study of melatonin sold over-the-counter shows that information on the label often does not reflect the content of the product. Here are the details:

Testing for Melatonin and Serotonin

The researchers tested the contents of 30 different melatonin supplements sold in Canada (likely similar to melatonin sold in the United States). Among them were products with 16 different brand names (the names were not published), in 5 different strengths, and in 7 different formulations, some containing herbal additives and others without. They wanted to see how closely the amount of melatonin listed on the label matched the melatonin content of the actual supplement.

They also screened for serotonin. Serotonin is a precursor of melatonin found in the herbal extracts with which commercial melatonin is often combined.

Variation in Melatonin Content

Holy cow! The actual melatonin content of the supplements varied quite a lot from the content listed on the labels. Some labels overstated the amount of melatonin contained in the product. The worst offender here was a capsule listed as containing 3 mg of melatonin that actually contained about 0.5 mg.

Other labels greatly underrepresented the amount of melatonin in the product. The worst offender here was a chewable tablet listed as containing 1.5 mg of melatonin that actually contained nearly 9 mg. (This is particularly concerning since chewable tablets are most often taken by children.)

Not only was the melatonin content of the product off by more than 10% of the listed content in about 71% of the products tested. As shocking as this may seem, the melatonin content varied widely from lot to lot of the same product. While the first lot of the chewable tablets cited above contained nearly 9 mg of melatonin, the second lot contained only 1.3 mg. That’s a variation of 465%.

Variation Could Be a Problem

Does the dose of melatonin you take matter? To some extent, yes, say the authors of a commentary on the study. Suboptimal doses might be ineffective. Taking too low a dose might lead you to believe melatonin didn’t work when a higher dose would.

Higher-than-advisable doses could lead to undesirable side effects. Too high a dose would be risky for people taking medications that interact with melatonin, or those who are pregnant or have diabetes. And the long-term effects of supplementary melatonin on prepubertal children are still unknown.

Overall Conclusions

So what are we to do with this information in light of the fact that the researchers haven’t revealed the names of the products they studied? Here’s a summary of what they learned, which, if you take or are contemplating taking melatonin, is worth consideration.

  • The least variable products overall were those containing the simplest mix of ingredients: the tablets or sublingual tablets with melatonin added to a filler. Apparently, added herbal extracts tend to make products more variable.
  • Except for the chewable tablet cited above, capsules generally showed the greatest lot-to-lot variability in melatonin content. (However, the melatonin content of some capsules was within 10% of the content listed on the label).
  • Unexpectedly, the three liquid products tested showed fairly high stability and low lot-to-lot variability.
  • The melatonin content of products listed as containing 1 or 1.5 mg of melatonin was quite a bit more likely to diverge from what was claimed than were products listed as containing higher doses. Products purportedly containing 1.5 mg of melatonin were also quite a bit more variable from lot to lot.

Unlisted Serotonin

Eight of the 30 products tested contained unlisted serotonin. While the presence of serotonin is hard to explain in supplements containing just melatonin and a filler, it might be expected in supplements containing herbal extracts. In one such product, a capsule listed as containing 3 mg of melatonin plus lavender, chamomile, and lemon balm, the serotonin content was assessed at 74 micrograms.

Serotonin raises significant health concerns if taken in excess, the Canadian authors say. It can lead to a condition called serotonin syndrome, which can be mild or fatal and “exacerbated by interactions with other medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the analgesic tramadol.”

I’d like to see the content of supplementary melatonin sold in the U.S. tested and reviewed by brand and formulation. ConsumerLab? Otherwise for people using over-the-counter melatonin (or interested in trying it) it’s a kind of Wild West situation when it comes to knowing which brand to buy. Pharmacists and doctors who prescribe melatonin may be better informed. Comments?

Sleep and Body Weight: A Close Relationship

“If you weigh too much, maybe you should try sleeping more.”

This commentary in the journal Sleep caught my eye. Flip as it sounds to a person who would sleep more if she could, it points to a relationship between sleep and body weight that should be widely publicized.

Sleep can also affect your ability to keep weight off. As for the relationship between insomnia and body weight, the latest news is surprising. Read on for details:

Insomnia with short sleep increases susceptibility to overweight“If you weigh too much, maybe you should try sleeping more.”

This commentary in the journal Sleep caught my eye. Flip as it sounds to a person who would sleep more if she could, it points to a relationship between sleep and body weight that should be widely publicized.

Sleep can also affect your ability to keep weight off. As for the relationship between insomnia and body weight, the latest news is surprising. Read on for details:

Sleep Deprivation and Weight Gain

It’s established now that sleep deprivation increases feelings of hunger (or interferes with feelings of satiation). Sleep deprivation occurs when sleep is arbitrarily restricted—as it might be during a research project in a sleep lab, when participants’ sleep is restricted to 4 hours a night—or when work or family responsibilities keep you from getting the sleep you need. Either way, the tendency is to eat more. And the more you eat, the more weight you gain.

People who are chronically sleep deprived don’t only tend to put on weight. They also risk developing metabolic syndrome, which is linked to serious medical problems like heart disease and diabetes.

So if the bathroom scale is inching upward every time you weigh yourself, consider not just changes to diet and exercise but also allowing more time for sleep if—and this an important caveat—you’re actually able to get more sleep. A mere 30 minutes more sleep a night can help with weight loss and greatly improve your long-term health.

Short Sleep and Body Weight

People who are short sleepers by nature—those who routinely sleep less (sometimes quite a bit less) than 6 hours a night—are also more susceptible to weight gain and obesity than those whose nights are longer. A study conducted over a period of 13 years showed that every extra hour of sleep duration was associated with a 50% reduction in risk of obesity.

Short sleep is also associated with impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Thus short sleepers are more at risk for developing diabetes as well.

Sleep Duration Is Not the Whole Story

But routinely shortened sleep is not the only sleep issue associated with weight problems. Research is showing now that sleep quality is related to the ability to lose weight and keep it off.

Unlike sleep duration, which can be objectively measured with polysomnography, sleep quality cannot be assessed objectively. So it’s typically measured with questions similar to these:

  • Do you regularly have trouble sleeping?
  • What’s the overall quality of your sleep?
  • How often do you experience a sense of well-being during the day?

One recent study found that better sleep quality and being a “morning person” correlated with successful weight loss maintenance. Compared with current enrollees in a weight loss program, people who’d lost at least 30 pounds and kept the weight off for at least a year reported significantly better sleep quality and were more often early risers.

In another study, investigators compared people who maintained a loss of at least 10% of their body weight to people who regained their lost weight. Men (but not women) who were successful at shedding pounds and keeping them off reported significantly better sleep quality (but not more sleep) than the weight regainers.

Do Insomniacs Typically Have Weight Problems?

Not necessarily, if results of the latest study can be believed. Researchers in Germany compared the body mass index (BMI) of 233 patients with “severe and chronic insomnia . . . showing objectively impaired sleep quality” to the BMI of 233 age- and gender-matched good sleepers. The results were surprising:

  • BMI, insomniacs: 23.8 kg/m2 (The “normal” BMI range is 18.5 to 24.9.)
  • BMI, good sleepers: 27.1 kg/m2

On average, the chronic insomniacs weighed significantly less than the good sleepers. If confirmed by other research, the result should be somewhat reassuring to those of us concerned about the consequences of insomnia. It would also lend support to the idea that insomnia has less to do with insufficient sleep than with excessive arousal (or hyperarousal) that may affect us 24/7.

Do you find yourself eating more after a couple bad nights?