All posts by Lois Maharg, The Savvy Insomniac

Lois Maharg has worked with language for many years. She taught ESL, coauthored two textbooks, and then became a reporter, writing about health, education, government, Latino affairs, and food. Her lifelong struggle with insomnia and interest in investigative reporting motivated her to write a book, The Savvy Insomniac: A Personal Journey through Science to Better Sleep. She now freelances as an editor and copy writer at On the Mark Editing.

Talking about insomnia with friends.

Insomnia Is Not a Trivial Concern

If you’ve struggled with chronic insomnia for years, even if you have some reliable management strategies, you may occasionally find yourself talking about insomnia with people whose looks and responses suggest it can’t be such a big deal.

“Aren’t there pills for that?” “My doctor says that’s self-inflicted. You just THINK you can’t sleep.” Here’s some new research that shows why persistent insomnia is a serious problem deserving of concern and treatment.

Sleep restriction therapy involves postponing bedtime

Sleep Restriction: New Thoughts on How It Works

Sleep restriction therapy helped me a lot. In fact, even without the other insomnia treatments usually offered with it, sleep restriction alone (enhanced by daily exercise) would probably have turned my chronic insomnia around.

Sleep researchers at Oxford recently proposed a new model of how the therapy works. If you haven’t yet tried sleep restriction, here’s why you’ll want to check it out.

Seasonal insomnia may be driven by vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D for Better Sleep?

Seasonal insomnia typically strikes at about this time of year. As the days get shorter, we’re exposed to shorter periods of sunlight, which can alter circadian rhythms and interfere with sleep.

A related problem has to do with our need for vitamin D, which may not be met in low sunlight conditions. Recent publications explore the effects of low levels of vitamin D on sleep, making supplements a good option in the cold weather.

Where to find a therapist who does CBT for insomnia

CBT for Insomnia: Where to Find the Help You Need

Here’s a question that often comes my way: “I’d like to try cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia [CBT-I], so where can I find a sleep therapist?”

The availability of CBT-I providers varies depending on where you live. Here’s where you’re likely to find help and where you’re not, and alternative ways to get the insomnia treatment you’re looking for.

Sleep-Onset Insomnia can be minimized by changing habits

Sleep Onset Insomnia: 8 Do’s and Don’ts for Better Sleep

Sleep-onset insomnia—trouble falling asleep at the beginning of the night—has been one of the biggest challenges in my life. By now, having gone through insomnia therapy and spent decades observing how changes in behavior and the environment affect my sleep, I know what I need to do—and what not to do—to get the best night’s sleep I can.

If you’ve got sleep-onset insomnia, here are 8 do’s and don’ts that may help to regularize your sleep.

Insomnia-driven sleep anxiety & herbal medicines

Anxiety About Sleep: Could Herbal Medicines Help?

“I have 5 years of anxiety about not being able to sleep to overcome,” began a query I received a month ago. “Once triggered, it is difficult to stop this downward spiral and sleep.”

Without a doubt, anxiety about sleep is one of the hardest aspects of insomnia to beat. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia can help to reduce sleep-related anxiety, as can other adjunctive therapies. But here’s an alternative treatment that might lead to calmer nights: plant-based medicines found to be effective for anxiety.

Waking up too early caused by bright summer sunrise

Don’t Let Insomnia Spoil the Summer

Do you experience a sudden onset of insomnia at about this time every year? Not much is written on seasonal insomnia that occurs in warm weather. Yet I’m convinced it’s a real phenomenon since my posts on summer insomnia get lots of traffic starting in May.

Here’s updated information—and speculation—on what could be causing the problem and how to get a better night’s sleep.

Insomnia treated with sleeping pill substitute

Off-Label Prescribing for Insomnia: What to Expect

Several drugs approved for insomnia are in the doghouse these days, and physicians are doing a fair amount of off-label prescribing. What medications should we expect to be prescribed in lieu of zolpidem (Ambien) and temazepam (Restoril)?

Using a “translational approach,” McGill University researchers have reviewed a host of medications with sedative properties and found the evidence base for some is stronger than for others. Here are the drugs they’ve found are most likely to work.