Month: May 2017

Managing light exposure and use of melatonin can curb travel-related insomnia & jet lag

Traveling With Insomnia: Don’t Let Jet Lag Spoil the Trip!

Do your summer plans include eastbound, transatlantic travel? If so, take precautions to avoid jet lag—the sleepy, sluggish, headachy feeling and insomnia that can seriously curtail your enjoyment of the first few days.

Here’s advice on how to prevent severe jet lag and hit the ground ready for action.

Insomnia sufferers should incorporate a bath into their bedtime routine

9 Ways to Keep Worry From Sabotaging Sleep

These days people are worried about jobs, health care, the environment, the possibility of worldwide war. Uncertainty about the future, and fear of negative outcomes, may rob even reliable sleepers of sleep from time to time.

But for many insomnia sufferers, worry and anxiety about sleep itself—“It’s two o’clock and I haven’t slept a wink!”; “If I don’t get to sleep now I’ll get sick!”—is an equally powerful enemy of sleep.

Here’s more about worry and insomnia and how to keep them from spoiling the night.

Tai chi may improve sleep for insomnia sufferers with other health problems

Tai Chi When Insomnia Isn’t the Only Problem

Insomnia combined with other health problems is bound to cause distress.

But help is at hand. New research shows that tai chi reduced insomnia symptoms in breast cancer survivors, suggesting that it may help with insomnia linked to other health problems, too.

Sleep restriction less difficult with enjoyable activities that keep you awake

11+ Nighttime Activities for Sleep Restriction

Here’s a complaint I often hear from insomniacs going through sleep restriction therapy: it’s hard to stay awake until bedtime. A related frustration comes with suddenly having extra time on your hands.

“I don’t know what to do with myself till 2:30 in the morning!” an insomnia sufferer groused to me.

Here are variations on 11 activities aimed at keeping you awake until the clock says it’s time to head to bed.

Stress and poor sleep can lead to chronic insomnnia

A Different Pathway to Chronic Insomnia

Let’s say you grow up in a family of champion sleepers, yourself included. At college, you sail through rowdy dormitory life sleeping like a log. Job interviews, stressful to some, don’t faze you. By 27, you’ve landed a good job and in a few years earned enough for a down payment on a house. Sleep is still dependable and stays that way for a decade.

Then, coinciding with a move and the birth of a second child, you find yourself wide awake at your normal bedtime, staring at walls. Soon this becomes the rule rather than the exception. Before you know it you’ve developed chronic insomnia. How can sleep go from good to bad so quickly?