Insomnia and mental decline can be alleviated with exercise

Exercise Improves Sleep, Preserves Mental Fitness

Are you pushing 60, already there, or beyond? You may have been a couch potato for most of your life, but now, if you’re envisioning a healthy retirement, you’d better change your ways.

Moderate-to-vigorous exercise can mitigate some effects of aging, including poor sleep quality and cognitive decline. Research generally supports this claim, so especially if you’re prone to insomnia, please check this out.

Insomnia may respond to treatment with ashwagandha

An Ayurvedic Herb for Better Sleep

Might Ayurvedic medicine—traditional medicine practiced in India for 3,000 years—offer an effective treatment for insomnia?

If you’re looking for an alternative treatment vetted by scientists in controlled clinical trials, the answer is no. But an Indian herb called ashwagandha is receiving attention as a substance that might help people with several health conditions, including chronic stress, anxiety, and memory loss. It’s also being studied as a possible sleep aid. Here’s more about it.

Insomnia may persist even after successful sleep apnea treatment

Insomnia or Sleep Apnea, or Both?

Let’s say that after years of experiencing insomnia you go in for a sleep study only to find out you have obstructive sleep apnea. Who knew? You’re outfitted with a breathing mask, you wear it as prescribed, and your sleep improves . . . somewhat.

But your insomnia symptoms are persistent, and you don’t have the kind of stamina you’d like during the day. What then?

Stress-related Insomnia can be alleviated with social support

Tips for Relieving Stress and Improving Sleep

Do stressful situations throw your sleep off track? You’d probably score high in sleep reactivity, a stable trait associated with insomnia. If a rough day at work kept you tossing and turning last night, then similarly charged situations—arguing with your spouse, getting bad news, preparing to speak in public—may disrupt your sleep now and then.

But what if the stress is chronic? Then it’s time to deal with it head on. Here are four ways to reduce stress and improve sleep.

Genetic variants may be an underlying factor in insomnia

Insomnia and Your Genes

If you suspect there’s a biological component to your insomnia, you’re probably right. Although talk about insomnia is mostly confined to situational triggers as well as habits and attitudes that keep insomnia alive, all models of chronic insomnia assume the existence of predisposing factors. Some of these factors may be inherited at birth.

What evidence is there for genetic involvement in insomnia, and where might it lead? A review published recently in Brain Sciences brings us up to date.

Sleep may be deeper and memory better by listening to timed exposure to pink noise at night

Pink Noise Enhances Sleep and Memory

An acoustic device may be able to accomplish for older adults what sleeping pills still cannot: enhance both sleep and memory.

Researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago conducted a study of 13 healthy older adults whose sleep deepened and whose recall of word pairs improved with timed acoustic stimulation at night. The discovery holds promise not just for older people with insomnia but also for everyone concerned about aging and memory impairment.

Persistent trouble sleeping can develop from years of shift work

“Sleep Was Easier to Give Up Than the Job”

Several people I interviewed for The Savvy Insomniac blamed their insomnia on stress at work. A trial lawyer attributed his nighttime wake-ups to “mostly job related stress.” A 52-year-old woman on Social Security disability saw her insomnia as resulting from 14 years of shift work as a dispatcher with emergency services.

Work can interfere with sleep in many ways, including shortening sleep duration. The CDC has just released a report on the categories of work most likely to shorten people’s sleep. Here’s what they are and how they may relate to chronic insomnia.

Nonrestorative sleep may or may not be a form of insomnia

When 7-Hour Nights Aren’t Good Enough

To many insomnia sufferers, the prospect of sleeping 7 hours a night sounds great. Insomniacs who write to me with news that they’ve achieved this feat after undergoing some type of insomnia treatment are thrilled.

Other people are not so thrilled about 7-hour nights. No matter how long they sleep, they wake up feeling unrested. Insufficiently refreshing sleep is the main symptom of people diagnosed with nonrestorative sleep.